(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Are you in business for your health? If not, you ought to be : a question which means a great saving to employer and worker alike : standards to be observed in developing personal efficiency and production"

HD 

7263 

A67 

1916 

NF1AH 



DIVISION 07 IflftlSTRIAL EYGI^TS 
OHIO STAT] BOARD 0? HEALTH ~* ~* 
AK2 YOU IN BUSINESS FOB YOUR H^AI^E? 



7- ; 





Are You In Business For Your Health? 



IF NOT, YOU OUGHT TO BE 



A QUESTION WHICH MEANS 



A Great Saving to Employer and Worker Alike 

STANDARDS to be Observed in Developing Personal 
EFFICIENCY AND PRODUCTION 




OLD AGE TWENTY YEARS TOO SOON 



WHY? 



Third (revised) edition. Issued March, 1916. 
DIVISION OF INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE -OHIO STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 

E. F. McCAMPBELL, Ph.D., M.D., Secretary and Executive Officer, Columbus, Ohio 



THE SITUATION 

PREVENTABLE DISEASES take off 43% of all workers. 

EXCEPT THE FARMER only 13% of occupied persons reach the age of 70 years. 

THE CHANCES OF LIVING as long as our fathers are steadily decreasing for all 

who have reached 40 years of age. 
HEART DISEASES causa, in Ohio, one-seventh of all deaths. Over half occur 

before the allotted 70 years of life. One-fourth occur before 50 years of age. 

Deaths from Heart Diseases are increasing at the rate of over 5% annually. 
ALL FORMS OF CHRONIC DISEASES are more PREVALENT in America than 

anywhere else in the civilized world. They are also INCREASING more 

rapidly in America than in any civilized country in the world. 

THE CAUSES 

I. Forgetting personal hygiene or the LAWS OF HEALTH in the midst of greater 
civilization. 

II. Personal ignorance of ONE'S OWN SELF, as made known by physical exami- 
nations. 

III. Presence of DANGERS IN THE SURROUNDINGS which cause sickness or 
add to sickness already present. These dangers are constantly increasing as 
time and civilization go on. 

. No help when once down, or LACK OF INSURANCE PROTECTION. 

THE CURE 

I. LAWS OF HEALTH — Fifteen in Number: Consult "How to Live" by Fisher and Fisk, 

The Life Extension Institute, N. Y. City. 

1. Ventilate every room you occupy. 

2. Wear lightweight, loose and porous clothes. 

3. Get out of doors. Recreate, do not dissipate. 

4. Breathe night-air at night time — open your bed-room windows. 

5. Breathe deeply — 100 times each day. 

6. Avoid over-eating and over-weight. 

7. Eat sparingly of meat and eggs. 

8. Eat some hard, some bulky and some raw foods, especially vegetables and 

fruits. 

9. Eat the first three mouthfuls slowly. Eat the balance slowly. Drink water 

principally between meals. 

10. Go to stool regularly and frequently. 

11. Stand, sit and walk erect. 

12. Do not allow poisons and infections to enter the body. 

13. Keep the teeth, gums and tongue clean. Don't forget to clean them before 

going to bed. 

14. Work, play, rest and sleep in moderation. Stop the pace which is killing the 

American race, especially lack of sleep. 

15. Keep serene. 

II. PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS — Find Out How Nearly "All Right" You Are. 

1. Remember that not one person in one hundred is physically perfect these 

days; for instance, your blood-pressure may be too high, or your heart 
action weak, or your kidneys affected, or your lungs "touched", all without 
signs which have seemed important to you. 

2. Grasp the first chance for a Physical Examination. When you know for cer- 

tain in what part you are not perfect, you will know what to do; and you 
will know also what not to do. "Know Thyself", said Socrates, 400 B. C, 
and we are just beginning to appreciate what the old sage meant. 



Are You In Business For Your Health? 



IF NOT, YOU OUGHT TO BE 



A QUESTION WHICH MEANS 



A Great Saving to Employer and Worker Alike 

STANDARDS to be Observed in Develop! 
EFFICIENCY AND PRODUC 





OLD AGE TWENTY YEARS TOO SOON 

WHY? 



Third (revised) edition. Issued March, 1916. 
DIVISION OF INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE- OHIO STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 

E. F. McCAMPBELL, Ph.D., M.D., Secretary and Executive Officer, Columbus, Ohio 



THE SITUATION 

PREVENTABLE DISEASES take off 43% of all workers. 

EXCEPT THE FARMER only 13% of occupied persons reach the age of 70 years. 

THE CHANCES OF LIVING as long as our fathers are steadily decreasing for all 

who have reached 40 years of age. 
HEART DISEASES cause, in Ohio, one-seventh of all deaths. Over half occur 

before the allotted 70 years of life. One-fourth occur before 50 years of age. 

Deaths from Heart Diseases are increasing at the rate of over 5% annually. 
ALL FORMS OF CHRONIC DISEASES are more PREVALENT in America than 

anywhere else in the civilized world. They are also INCREASING more 

rapidly in America than in any civilized country in the world. 

THE CAUSES 

I. Forgetting personal hygiene or the LAWS OF HEALTH in the midst of greater 
civilization. 

II. Personal ignorance of ONE'S OWN SELF, as made known by physical exami- 
nations. 

III. Presence of DANGERS IN THE SURROUNDINGS which cause sickness or 

add to sickness already present. These dangers are constantly increasing as 
time and civilization go on. 

IV. No help when once down, or LACK OF INSURANCE PROTECTION. 

THE CURE 

I. LAWS OF HEALTH — Fifteen in Number: Consult "How to Live" by Fisher and Fisk, 
xx ., The Life Extension Institute, N. Y. City. 

1. Ventilate every room you occupy. 

2. Wear lightweight, loose and porous clothes. 

3. Get out of doors. Recreate, do not dissipate. 

4. Breathe night-air at night time — open your bed-room windows. 

5. Breathe deeply — 100 times each day. 

6. Avoid over-eating and over-weight. 

7. Eat sparingly of meat and eggs. 

8. Eat some hard, some bulky and some raw foods, especially vegetables and 

fruits. 

9. Eat the first three mouthfuls slowly. Eat the balance slowly. Drink water 

principally between meals. 

10. Go to stool regularly and frequently. 

11. Stand, sit and walk erect. 

12. Do not allow poisons and infections to enter the body. 

13. Keep the teeth, gums and tongue clean. Don't forget to clean them before 

going to bed. 

14. Work, play, rest and sleep in moderation. Stop the pace which is killing the 

American race, especially lack of sleep. 

15. Keep serene. 

II. PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS — Find Out How Nearly "All Right" You Are. 

1. Remember that not one person in one hundred is physically perfect these 

days; for instance, your blood-pressure may be too high, or your heart 
action weak, or your kidneys affected, or your lungs "touched", all without 
signs which have seemed important to you. 

2. Grasp the first chance for a Physical Examination. When you know for cer- 

tain in what part you are not perfect, you will. know what to do; and you 
will know also what not to do. "Know Thyself", said Socrates, 400 B. C, 
and we are just beginning to appreciate what the old sage meant. 



Of. 



Are You In Business For Your Health? 



IF NOT, YOU OUGHT TO BE 



A QUESTION WHICH MEANS 



A Great Saving to Employer and Worker Alike 

STANDARDS to be Observed in Developing Personal 
EFFICIENCY AND PRODUCTION ;T-> 



■ 





OLD AGE TWENTY YEARS TOO SOON 



WHY? 



Third (revised) edition. Issued March, 1916. 
DIVISION OF INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE-OHIO STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 

E. F. McCAMPBELL, Ph.D., M.D., Secretary and Executive Officer, Columbus, Ohio 



THE SITUATION 

PREVENTABLE DISEASES take off 43% of all workers. 

EXCEPT THE FARMER only 13% of occupied persons reach the age of 70 years. 

THE CHANCES OF LIVING as long as our fathers are steadily decreasing for all 

who have reached 40 years of age. 
HEART DISEASES cause, in Ohio, one-seventh of all deaths. Over half occur 

before the allotted 70 years of life. One-fourth occur before 50 years of age. 

Deaths from Heart Diseases are increasing at the rate of over 5% annually. 
ALL FORMS OF CHRONIC DISEASES are more PREVALENT in America than 

anywhere else in the civilized world. They are also INCREASING more 

rapidly in America than in any civilized country in the world. 

THE CAUSES 

I. Forgetting personal hygiene or the LAWS OF HEALTH in the midst of greater 
civilization. 

II. Personal ignorance of ONE'S OWN SELF, as made known by physical exami- 
nations. 

III. Presence of DANGERS IN THE SURROUNDINGS which cause sickness or 

add to sickness already present. These dangers are constantly increasing as 
time and civilization go on. 

IV. No help when once down, or LACK OF INSURANCE PROTECTION. 

THE CURE 

I. LAWS OF HEALTH — Fifteen in Number: Consult "How to Live" by Fisher and Fisk, 
., The Life Extension Institute, N. Y. City. 

1. Ventilate every room you occupy. 

2. Wear lightweight, loose and porous clothes. 

3. Get out of doors. Recreate, do not dissipate. 

4. Breathe night-air at night time — open your bed-room windows. 

5. Breathe deeply — 100 times each day. 

6. Avoid over-eating and over-weight. 

7. Eat sparingly of meat and eggs. 

8. Eat some hard, some bulky and some raw foods, especially vegetables and 

fruits. 

9. Eat the first three mouthfuls slowly. Eat the balance slowly. Drink water 

principally between meals. 

10. Go to stool regularly and frequently. 

11. Stand, sit and walk erect. 

12. Do not allow poisons and infections to enter the body. 

13. Keep the teeth, gums and tongue clean. Don't forget to clean them before 

going to bed. 

14. Work, play, rest and sleep in moderation. Stop the pace which is killing the 

American race, especially lack of sleep. 

15. Keep serene. 

II. PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS — Find Out How Nearly "All Right" You Are. 

1. Remember that not one person in one hundred is physically perfect these 

days; for instance, your blood-pressure may be too high, or your heart 
action weak, or your kidneys affected, or your lungs "touched", all without 
signs which have seemed important to you. 

2. Grasp the first chance for a Physical Examination. When you know for cer- 

tain in what par* you are not perfect, you will know what to do ; and you 
will know also what not to do. "Know Thyself", said Socrates, 400 B. C, 
and we are just beginning to appreciate what the old sage meant. 



Are You In Business For Your Health? 



IF NOT, YOU OUGHT TO BE 



A QUESTION WHICH MEANS 



A Great Saving to Employer and Worker Alike 

STANDARDS to be Observed in Developing Personal 
EFFICIENCY AND PRODUCTIJ 



^oniani^ 



JU1I 3 1916 




OLD AGE TWENTY YEARS TOO SOON 

WHY? 

Third (revised) edition. Issued March, 1916. 
DIVISION OF INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE-OHIO STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 

E. F. McCAMPBELL, Ph.D., M.D., Secretary and Executive Officer, Columbus, Ohio 



THE SITUATION 

PREVENTABLE DISEASES take off 43% of all workers. 

EXCEPT THE FARMER only 13% of occupied persons reach the age of 70 years. 

THE CHANCES OF LIVING as long as our fathers are steadily decreasing for all 

who have reached 40 years of age. 
HEART DISEASES cause, in Ohio, one-seventh of all deaths. Over half occur 

before the allotted 70 years of life. One-fourth occur before 50 years of age. 

Deaths from Heart Diseases are increasing at the rate of over 5% annually. 
ALL FORMS OF CHRONIC DISEASES are more PREVALENT in America than 

anywhere else in the civilized world. They are also INCREASING more 

rapidly in America than in any civilized country in the world. 

THE CAUSES 

I. Forgetting personal hygiene or the LAWS OF HEALTH in the midst of greater 
civilization. 

II. Personal ignorance of ONE'S OWN SELF, as made known by physical exami- 
nations. 

III. Presence of DANGERS IN THE SURROUNDINGS which cause sickness or 

add to sickness already present. These dangers are constantly increasing as 
time and civilization go on. 

IV. No help when once down, or LACK OF INSURANCE PROTECTION. 

THE CURE 

I. LAWS OF HEALTH — Fifteen in Number: Consult "How to Live" by Fisher and Fisk, 

The Life Extension Institute, N. Y. City. 

1. Ventilate every room you occupy. 

2. Wear lightweight, loose and porous clothes. 

3. Get out of doors. Recreate, do not dissipate. 

4. Breathe night-air at night time — open your bed-room windows. 

5. Breathe deeply — 100 times each day. 

6. Avoid over-eating and over-weight. 

7. Eat sparingly of meat and eggs. 

8. Eat some hard, some bulky and some raw foods, especially vegetables and 

fruits. 

9. Eat the first three mouthfuls slowly. Eat the balance slowly. Drink water 

principally between meals. 

10. Go to stool regularly and frequently. 

11. Stand, sit and walk erect. 

12. Do not allow poisons and infections to enter the body. 

13. Keep the teeth, gums and tongue clean. Don't forget to clean them before 

going to bed. 

14. Work, play, rest and sleep in moderation. Stop the pace which is killing the 

American race, especially lack of sleep. 

15. Keep serene. 

II. PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS — Find Out How Nearly "All Right" You Are. 

1. Remember that not one person in one hundred is physically perfect these 

days; for instance, your blood-pressure may be too high, or your heart 
action weak, or your kidneys affected, or your lungs "touched", all without 
signs which have seemed important to you. 

2. Grasp the first chance for a Physical Examination. When you know for cer- 

tain in what part you are not perfect, you will know what to do ; and you 
will know also what not to do. "Know Thyself", said Socrates, 400 B. C, 
and we are just beginning to appreciate what the old sage meant. 



Are You In Business For Your Health? 



IF NOT, YOU OUGHT TO BE 



A QUESTION WHICH MEANS 



A Great Saving to Employer and Worker Alike 

STANDARDS to be Observed in Developing Personal 
EFFICIENCY AND PRODUCTION 




OLD AGE TWENTY YEARS TOO SOON 

WHY? 



Third (revised) edition. Issued March, 1916. 
DIVISION OF INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE-OHIO STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 

E. F. McCAMPBELL, Ph.D., M.D., Secretary and Executive Officer, Columbus, Ohio 



THE SITUATION 

PREVENTABLE DISEASES take off 43% of all workers. 

EXCEPT THE FARMER only 13% of occupied persons reach the age of 70 years. 

THE CHANCES OF LIVING as long as our fathers are steadily decreasing for all 

who have reached 40 years of age. 
HEART DISEASES cause, in Ohio, one-seventh of all deaths. Over half occur 

before the allotted 70 years of life. One-fourth occur before 50 years of age. 

Deaths from Heart Diseases are increasing at the rate of over 5% annually. 
ALL FORMS OF CHRONIC DISEASES are more PREVALENT in America than 

anywhere else in the civilized world. They are also INCREASING more 

rapidly in America than in any civilized country in the world. 

THE CAUSES 

I. Forgetting personal hygiene or the LAWS OF HEALTH in the midst of greater 
civilization. 

!I. Personal ignorance of ONE'S OWN SELF, as made known by physical exami- 
nations. 

III. Presence of DANGERS IN THE SURROUNDINGS which cause sickness or 

add to sickness already present. These dangers are constantly increasing as 
time and civilization go on. 

IV. No help when once down, or LACK OF INSURANCE PROTECTION. 

THE CURE 

I. LAWS OF HEALTH — Fifteen in Number: Consult "How to Live" by Fisher and Fisk, 

The Life Extension Institute, N. Y. City. 

1. Ventilate every room you occupy. 

2. Wear lightweight, loose and porous clothes. 

3. Get out of doors. Recreate, do not dissipate. 

4. Breathe night-air at night time — open your bed-room windows. 

5. Breathe deeply — 100 times each day. 

6. Avoid over-eating and over-weight. 

7. Eat sparingly of meat and eggs. 

8. Eat some hard, some bulky and some raw foods, especially vegetables and 

fruits. 

9. Eat the first three mouthfuls slowly. Eat the balance slowly. Drink water 

principally between meals. 

10. Go to stool regularly and frequently. 

11. Stand, sit and walk erect. 

12. Do not allow poisons and infections to enter the body. 

13. Keep the teeth, gums and tongue clean. Don't forget to clean them before 

going to bed. 

14. Work, play, rest and sleep in moderation. Stop the pace which is killing the 

American race, especially lack of sleep. 

15. Keep serene. 

II. PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS — Find Out How Nearly "All Right" You Are. 

1. Remember that not one person in one hundred is physically perfect these 

days; for instance, your blood-pressure may be too high, or your heart 
action weak, or your kidneys affected, or your lungs "touched", all without 
signs which have seemed important to you. 

2. Grasp the first chance for a Physical Examination. When you know for cer- 

tain in what part you are not perfect, you will know what to do; and you 
will know also what not to do. "Know Thyself", said Socrates, 400 B. C, 
and we are just beginning to appreciate what the old sage meant. 




< 

DC 

H 
(0 

D 
Q 

Z 

Ll 
O 

z 
o 

CO 

> 

Q 

i 

I 
H 
-i 
< 
LI 
I 

LL 

o 

h 
z 
111 
£ 

< 
Q. 

Li 
Q 

W 
I- 
< 

h 



< 
< 

Q 

I 
I- 
_l 
< 
UJ 
I 



LU 



ill 



< 2 

H o 
2< 

"sS 

■?■ q 

E'S 



52 



•^ 2 









... O OT 





■ V 












': ft 






i 6 






i^ 










• bo 


1 ho 




; c 


: c 




i v 


i W 

: <u 
jffi 

: <u 
: c 
•' ft 
; £ 

IP 




i w 






1 c 


; oo 




• E 


;3 




jQ 


i c 
!> 

• 6 






i 5 




\jz 


: o 




: ho 


: u 










ii-r 


■ ho 
C 

JT 
u 

5o 
















: S 


XI 




;> 


2 

o 

6 




: u ; 






: o : 






: o 






:<C 


T3 : 
a : 




: 6 






•2; i 


6 ■ 






z; : 


- 








: S : 




i- 














: S : 


>> ■ 


g 








: S : 


uS i 


u 
















■O • 








c 






c 


: i> : 


a; : 






P i 


Ifl 


: £ :' 


O ! 


S 


: cs i 

: c 
: ~ 


5 : 


id 


: u" : 






• ^ J 


u ! 




; o :, 


at : 




: "^ 


« 


U5 




rt i 






o : 


1 


!l !« 


q ■•' 


o 


: o : 


\i 










'• t- : 






: o : 


















j jz 






i 00 j 


j • 




i '5 


S :• 


J 


■ ^C 


3 ir 


J 


:— j 






: 4> 






!| ! 


: 
jj ;. 


» 


: to 


















: o : < 


J : 


3 




* ;P 


3 



a ft 



c 5 
Otfl 



5- £ 



Q 


c 




— 


< 




^ 


- 


N 


CO 


-o 


u 


< 


D 




i/; 


R 


O 




Q 



r 1 


K 


n 




o 


3 


o 


CO 

i-3 


j- 1 





g sr g 



o 
S 3 « 

n-. w co 



5 2 



2- s 



S- 3 A- 






H O 



o3 3 



^^ 






° ^ 

0, X 



EL ih- 



S 3! o 



£r »-+- rrn 



3 „ _ 



— " Q- 



3 1 i»J 

en ^ l—i 



— / -fa" 



"-5 o? 



& I -J 



0' 

>- 
I 

-i 
< 

h 

I< 

IL< 

O Q 



z 
o 

> 

Q 
i 
i 

X 

h 



I 
I- 

< 

UJ 

I 

-J 
< 

Z 

o 

CO 

o: 

111 
Q. 



£ X 



s 2 

X < 



: h4 

a 

o 

> 



; c 


< 


u 




x 


fl 




w 


s 


H 


►4 


"3 




< 


c/5 


« 


>-H 




w 


1/3 


W5 


fH 


>< 


W 


£ 


ffi 


I* 




CU 


w 



:- 



g > 







a 


Cfl 


w 


H 


« 


en 


w 


< 


O 


w 


W 


fe 


.— 



ti d 



o 

w 

> 3 

J-H P 

co 2 









co ; 








£ 




: w 










i Co 




< 


■ 3 


: 5" 




p_ 


n 


• 5 






5" 










1 p 




P 




ft 

: n 


■ o 








: o 


Er 




: ° 










i rt 


re 






•-! 


p 








ft 


■ 2 
ft* 

; c 
! >< 

i >-3 
: c 


j ^ 
i p - 

i 3 






: o* 
; ft 




! Oi 




o 




! p*i 




! C 




: 3 : 








: a.: 




o 






§ 








6 
















p 




'■ CO 




s. 




i c 




! : 




i 3 

: st* 
: rt 
i 3 






: hd 


! p 






: 3 


i l o - 






! ft 








: C 
3 


i ft 






o 








3 
















: p 




: TJ: 






■ rt 


i p | 




• M 


i 3 


i o'i 




i 3 


; p 
ft 


i 3 . : 




i w 








■ si* 








• •< 


i o° 






n 


| 3 






■ g 














rt 


p 






p 


CO 






s. 


o 








o 


r 








i 


CO; 






re 


P i 






o- 






_CO 


ft 
X 








■a 






3 


p 






P 


3 






■■"■ 


2. 






p. 


o 








3 






ft 








P 








ft 








*1 


CO 


o : 




p 


c 


< 


!> 

m 




"2. 


rt ■ 

3 






o' 


rt ■ 






5' 


3 : 






3 


"i 






o* 









ft • 


i-3 






p ; 






O 


3*! 














3.; 


5'i 






oq ; 














•< 







< 

i— i 
Q 

< 
i— i 

H 

CO 

Q 

fa 

o 

w 

H 
< 

o 

I— I 

fa 

I— I 

H 

Ph 
fa 

o 























i 

In 

CD 






























Q 




















.O 
























bH 


















3 
























S 


















-H 




























H 














cd 






























CO 














IS 






















o\ 






< 














a 






















1—1 






H 














CO 






























CO 












































hH 

Q 














£ 

CO 






























fe 














"o 






























O 














•fi 
O 

CJ 






























H 














"c3 






























H 














CO 






























< 




v. 










rt 






























o 




o 








X! 


























CO 
CO 


w 










*T3 


o 


























cu 


fe 


a 


+$ 






« 3 


























Ih 


t— i 


CO "^ 






Ih CO 


























•a 


o 


(L) c 

;3 cj 






a! '--' 
cu 


























-a 
< 


c 5 






rt to 

co 4; 

£ 2 

2 Q 


























| 


< 
o 

1— 1 

Q 
W 


CU cd 

CO 

a; to 

& 6 
















CO 

CJ 










u: 




G\ 


^ 2 
o a, 

.2 S 
M E? 
o w 






£ he 
>> c 

CO •- 

2 .§ 


"v. 










cd 

HH 

"(3 








bfl 
cd 

m- -a 












CK 


C 










"+j 








c 






W) 0) 
CO ■•« 






a s 


"a 










*3 












•r ^ 






cd o 


CJ 










T3 








Q S 






Q o 






Q O 












< 




































^^ 








































■"K I- 














CO 


























cu v^ 






u 








« 


,C 
























i-3 >. 






cd 
cu 








< 


-4-* 
























>^ 






>H 








A 








































P 


~Xi 






































O 


«4H 

o 






















'P^-N 














i— i 


























r <- 
















u 
























5 g 














< 

ft< 

•J 

< 


C 

o 
U 










i 


J 








CO 

c 

O 


W w 






c 

.2 

v> 

cd 














Jx 




"5 
















a 

3 








o 






c 


u 


cu 








o 








CJ 








l-H 

H 






o 


o 




C 














cj 
O 










CO 

H 
< 

H 

CO 

Q 
2 


Ih 

o 
o 
o 


O cu 


3 
u 
o 

O 


u 

o 

c 
o 

"en 

CO 

V 

o 
u 

a 


J3 
cj 

3 

CO 

-^ 

Ih 

O 

<4H 
O 


C 

(j 
o 
o 

c 

CD 

CO 






O 
OJ 

cd 

E 

CO 

•a 

o 
o 
be 


c 
_o 

cd 

ex 

u 

CO o 

c o 
o V( _ i 

'■§ ° 






o 

** CO 
CJ CO 

S C 

g ° 

CH CO 

■** cd 










< 
< 


1) 
bo 

< 


■tf'S 




cu 

Ih 


cu 
u 
O 

c 


1 




o 


C cu 

3 p 

u s 

cu cd 






« CJ 
CO CO 

4* ■ - 
CO O 
CO 
CU 








55 

o 

1 w 
K 
W 

ft- 




'u ^-' 
(B'O 

as 

. u 
<u o 




4-* 

c 

V 
(0 
V 

u 
ftn 

R 


.£ 

;~ 
u 

Ih 

cd 


cu 

c 

o 
<v 


cd 

c 


C- 


CO 

3 

.2 
'> 

cu 

u 

ft, 






CO 

3 
O 

*> 
CO 
J-l 








(1 

CO 


- M ^ CO 
Ih W S 

« ^ c 
>> i -5 

1 < m 








CO 










ft 


H 


Q 


W 






















ft, 











•31BDgi}J33 jo jpeq uo suoipnaisui sag •suuaj ui^id ui SISONOVIG 3}B}S pinoqs suEpisXqj 
•lUBiJodiut Xj3a si NOIXVdflDDO J° l«3UJ31B}s riscxa ai[j r p3i[ddns X[[np,ii50 sq pinoqs uoijbuijojui jo uiaj; XjaA^ — -g -^j 

(JHO03H XN3NVHaad V SI SIHX~ XNI HXIM A^NIV^d 3XIHM 






o n 




3 3 


W 




•-I 


p -. 

3 3* 


ft 

< 


CL3 


n 


_.. CO 


s 


3 en 





e 3 O 

co p o 

ft p 

fto.g'- 

co 3 o 
ft ft 3 



p 



co 



« 3. hi 



3'° S 



O &. 

n> <2 -s 

S"-5 5 



2 ° 
S3 

rt. 3*^ 
3* rt c> 

3- O ^ 



2 ^ -• go 

^ ~ p < 3 ft 

3 - 3 



Is 






i-t >o 



•3 P 2" 

13 2 



w 



(u 



6 S 

•3-0 

SI o 

•3 rt " O 
5. 3" S. 2 Ct 3 
2 o 3 « "> 5 



cr ^ p 
a'" c.3 Q 

3 S-^3 2! 

p 3 rt fD P 



3*2 



3^ 



" ° g Cfq p «, < 



co'p 2 <*> 



3- b o S 

►+• . a 3 r 



o'S 



•g 3 o- 

5 <t> fD 

fD t-» 

3 ** 

"*• S° 

M 3*3 

p ft 3 
i-t - 
n 

p rtci; 

3 3"^ 

CO P ,— 

<T 3 g 






cr fD 



3 ~ 

p R- 

3" fD s' 

° P ^ 
£? P 

3^ « 

~2 « 

3 3- o 
a.3 p 

g-CO CO 
3 r-t CO 

co 2. P 



3 » 



3 » 



O O 

rt i-t 
3* p 
0) 3 

3" rt 

N O 
P _ 



CD i-i 

i-n 3 

2 5- 

(T> fD 



T O ^ » " » 

" ►+. q CO i-t g. 

o ^ 3. p n.5 
.2 3* ^ B P 

° - » o < 

S 3-fi 3 n <* 

* n § § 3£- 



3 O p 

r> 3 - 
o 3 -.3 






to 



m co 



o c < 



o ■ -«- 






O - fD 



■s-s; 



«su 



3-3 S 



-^rs p « O 3 

O S 3t»' rt 

^g3,0 

erg 3-3 3-o 
p ji • (-!• c o 

co cs "3 fD co 3 

2 s »i n> co "> 

•\> 3 O p -t 

«, cl 3 <<: '< 



3* Ci. fD § ,-, 

co a, "-" »— 3 

3 S"^ s 3" 

r+ 3 ^CL™ 

O 3;3* i 

O « Xi H. 3* 
Q3 z: T- 



^ fD 



*-r* **. 



^ fD ■<; ^. 3- 

D- O CO «. nj 

co ^-- h-. rj 3 
co o a 3 



o 2.5-^3 

""^ 3 -^- 00 



3-0 



•t ►"! 



fD 



5.'° 2. 

fD 3 co' 
-> 3* O 



Cu< 3 O *< 
■2.0 3 " 



3 f> o 3 
3.P o «• 
O- 3 



t±5 
» 3-S 



o 3 ^r 
J- 3 3-3 



*3tJ 



o 
O 

> 

bd 
IS 



C/3 

fD 



P 

H 
«< 



fD O 

2i3 H. 

t/5 (-p rt 

< 2 3}< 



CO co fD J? 
, fD — • ft 

cr co Cu p q, 

« . ft 3 S 

O -t ^ o 

3 -* » 

-.2 "" 3"° *~* 

tt fD 3J* ro >< O 

«» "co S: o g 3 

£ 3 JS w sj. 5i 

fD Op 3/ff. O 

13. J 3 ^ co t- o (U 



3-"3 ! 

o 2 i 

3 CO ' 

fD _ < 



3°» 

o 2 

rt- 3. CO 
fD 3- 3 

cl cr. o 
o 3- 

S 5 » 

3 " CO 



2.X 

I CO p 

■ 3 T3 

3* ^ 

fD fD 

, p n , « 

co P o 

fD co !i 

co s 

P p 

"■ox 

-3T^ 
2 2.Q 



fl ft 3 ft 

o 3 3 O 

3 



3-n £L 
■*• a* 

S.5« 



CO p p i - " „. 
f 333 3 

., 3* co o' 

P fl 3-3* 
3 3 g _ 

O O ^ rt 

d. 3 < o 

►*■ rr 3* n 

2 3"^ c 

ft 3 ^,1 

ft 3i 

2*0-2 S. 

Z$ ~' 
o 2.3- 

CO p Jj- 
Wip 



3 *& 



P i O 
3 2-o 

a. 3^ n 

o 3 
£±.3"?. 



2 &< 

"■ft s 

-t p 3 

fD CO 0) 

a- a> 

- r— I 

K '° tT 

3- » 

3 
P 



ft 



fT 3 3 

" fD >0 

h-, 2 o 
p 



3 

p 

cr.o f» cr. 

ft h+>3- 



o © p 



o ft 3- 2« «P 

£+"3 ft 

2^° 3 

2 5 5 



». «s 



fD 

G. 
o ' s"- 5'sh 

if " ^ o 3 S. 

^ 3-S-.B f? ►*» 
„ 3i<-» "O a> 2 

H CO B 3. CO . 

O 1 3. 
3 << K 



fj ft rt s 

8> < 3*3- 

o f* ft 

■"' 3' 

2 o £ rt 



■P. 3" 2 



o-S-** n 

3 3 A to 

£L™ 2 ? 



3 >5 
003- 

h * > 3* co" 
ft ft 
p 1 T 

n ft 

S-S^2. 

fD JJ, 

o*" 2T 

» R.1 
ft ^ 

fl r n- 

fD 

o 

►1 ft 

2 * c 

ft 1;y CO 
CO W p 

i|"S 

3- .** o 

3* ?r 



3*^ 
ft 3: 



^. ^O 

■<: ft p 



w S < 
^rt- ft 

5" 3 2. 
' £ 3 

p 



fH3 



>o 



2.3 

J—p 

O 3 



«• fD 
CtP 
~o 
^ 3* 

3-. 

fl> 2: 

co" 

*< cr. 

fD i-» 

S n 



2*0 



«!• 




< 
W 
m 

Q 

•J 

< 

f-H 

H 

CO 

P 

O 

H 
H 

< 

U 

I— i 

fa. 
i— i 

H 
W 

u 



W 

H 

< 

Oh 

fa 

o 



w 



o 

H 

fa 
< 
O 

l-H 

fa 
I— I 

H 
fa 
fa 
O 

fa 

< 

u 

I— I 

Q 
fa 

% 



A 

U 



co 






fa 


.3 




< 






fa 


>i-i 




fa- 


£l 




O 


O 




1— 1 






H 


>> 




fa 


+j 




< 


C 

3 




fa 


O 




fa 


o 




< 






O 






H 






h- ( 

H 


o 




< 


o 
O 




CO 




O <u 


fa 




14 




TJ^: 


< 


bd 


£ * 


i-l 


< 


T3 £ 


< 




1) H 


55 




U — ' 


O 




n'O 


CO 

fa 






fa 
fa 


4> 
CO 


<D O 
CO 

'to 



I 

a o 

3 



fa 



S .2 



<n *j3 



Oi 

5 6 



fa 



fa 



PQ 



c >> 



c« 




c 


2 




3 

'■ > 


a> 


to 


<; 


"O 


3 


O 


O 


o 




O 

bo 


rt 







ex 


<u 


o 


3 


E 




o 


rt 


c 


O 


£ 








JX 


(0 





fa 



V 


m 


3 
T3 


c 










>> 


, 


C 


n 


cfl 








<-H 






cti 






t/3 


en 


4) 


P 



fa 



3 

e 

a 
"o 
O 

-i 
c 



3 
fa 



C3 

w 

h 

fa 
< 

fa 
K 
fa 
O 

P 
fa 
< 

o 

fa 

fa 

H 
< 

fa 

CO 



■3}Boy;iJ33 jo >(3Bq uo suoi:pru}sui aag -suusj uiB[d ui SISONOVIQ 3: 1 b: ) s pinoqs suEpisXqj 
■\unuoduii Xj3a st MOIXVdQDDO J° luamams 13Bxa aqj, -paticldns X[jnj3JE0 aq p[noqs uoiyeuuojut JO uiaji XjsaJ — -g "j^ 

<3HO03H XN3NVWH3d V SI SIHX— HNI HUM AINIV^ 3XIHM 



s- a 

►J. co 

§3 



v 



P 
3 


— i 


< 


Cu3 


o 




r/i 


c 


3 


CO 


CO 


3. 

c 


RO 




P 


a 




^ 


o 






c 


P 


cr>n 






p 


oj" 


Q. 


o' 


a 




3 


P 




to 








CD 


o 


3 



3 rt 

p 1 

Q. rt- 
rt 3. "5. 

' 3,' O 
<7Q S-'-i 
- '-t ^ 

BJf3 
p rt- 

3 3 S 
co'O ^ 



n 3r 

2 ° 



p 3*^ 

3/crq * 

rt Er '~'" K 
rt. CD 

n -» a 

O. O ST 

K' 5-2. 

CO ". ^ 



3. o n § 5- ^ 

^ ?> P 5 3 rt 

5 3 3- to 

3* o 3 • n 






5- CO. 



a 



a 



o a. 

crn a. 

rt 2 "* 

3' 3 <^ 

2 "3 to 

CTQ p Co 

° s 

P ft. 



t?o =r 3 



i'O o 

(D 2 

•g 3 o* 
g n> m 

2- «* 

£. ~* 3 

■<:go 
p 2T^ 

w rt 3 
rt » 

rt 

P 3 -±.3; 
3 3"^ 

CO P rtj 

<T 3 o 

« CO 

Oy » 

CSS <*> 
3*2 " 
P 5 3. rr 

g rt- g* 

crq 



J? ™ a 
o p * 
D.SS £| 

2o-3 
3^ « 

2 3-3 
i 3- rt 
Q 3 « 



CO CO 



rt 



O <"> 

rt P 



o c S 

rt, I (T> 



in T (J 

rt S'C2 



3 «*• 
P. co 



3^ 

3*S 

P **■ 

rt S 
rt ^> 
3 O 

n> o" 
X s 



O o 

^ 1 

3* p 
(T> 3 

3*^ 

p 3; 



2 5- 



3' 
rt 


p 

3 

o 
3 1 

o 




CO 

3 

o 

a 


p fl 


■ 


Hh 




CO 


►1 


I ii 





S 1 

fl> 


1 

<3- 


p 
<< 


P 


o 

3 


Q 




Q 


O 
7T 


< 




C<j' 


-1 
p 


Co 


ft 




^) 


p. 


s 


3 

o 


ra 





Ii 



1 J.3 --3 

3^^3 n, oj rt 
O oj EL3 
3 C. — ° rt 
3 rt i3 •-! 
p 3 p? rt p 



P 



^ ^ 3T^ 
■^ a.o.g OT « 

o"2 SL£? - s 

erg 3-3 5'2 
p S. - 5* 3 2 

co o >0 rt co 3 
c" ~« P n « ^ 

<■ 3 ° ^ £. 

< O — • 3 >-• 

2 a £J ^5T co 

~5> 3 O P -1 

«> p.3 ><; *< 



o ^ & 

3 O p 

r* 3 - i-a 

3" „.3- ^ 3* 

3 r rt 

o 3 S£.^ ^ 

rt ►+> o, 3 5 

3 3\ rt «•«> 
K P « 3" 2-. 

rt 3 ' <"i 

oj n 3 O 

rt- p CO ^3'— 
rt CO <"h h-J _ 

M rt ^3-^ 
O -" rt rt 2. 

H>K, «i'*'S) 
3>3 rt 2 ^ 

n 3 2 2 ° 

3;3 c § js- 

co (T) "~ 3 
3 ET"< a 3* 

rt- 3 - R - ri> 

O 3; 3-, -1 

3 rt ^ Si 3- 

3. rt CO —.03 

CO — ■ ►.. r^ 3 

co o a 3 

o 2-5'*- °- 
3 "^ S£. 



3* 03 ^ 
rt CO 2 

p 



5 5: 



rt 



3" 2 



3-r,-^ 
rt S 3* 



-+, co rt •O 

S 5.' 2 2 

5-rt 3 K- 
Co -i Q. o 

' g.ff.3. 

• ga 

P CO • 

*i rt- rt 



o 
O 

> 

w 
w 
f 
t- 1 



03 
rt 
o 






n 



3 3-£ 

O 3j 

& 3 S 

CO ,-[, rt 

rt - _ 

O _ rt 

rt ^ rt 

- 1 r> ° 

P O rt- 

S3-0 

rt rt i-i-> 

3**5 3* 

O 2 rt 

3 co -I 



O CO fl3 rt- i-t 

O 3* co O rt 

3 O _ >° 

3 3 rt rt 3 

3 3.P O 3. ^. 

2 S3 3 -| gj 

2 co 5; rt « 
-- ■ — rt - • rt 
O cr co C3- 03 Q. 

3 rt rt 3 ►;• 

O -t >3 rt 

3 ^^ W 

2.2 - B-rt — 

?s. «"•§.? 

^ » St o g a 

rt CO ry. c/5 3 i— . 

3 c rt co P 31 

2 2- p> 5^ - • ° 

2. y co S. O P 

O " rt rt 3 r* 



3.5 3 2 
S'S.Q 3 



3J* 



P P - 

"> 3. 

CIS - 

., 3" co 

P rt 3- 

3 3 o 

O rt < 

c 2 - 
-3 1 
3'cr 3* 



rt 3*i 
p P rt 

1 r* CO 

-. rt |_i 

3- co 3 "TJ 

3 r+ H, 

3 <» 

2 2*< 
» o* 



ttS. 



n> 



Li-O 



3?.S 

rt 3 r+ 

rt 3^ 

3. Curt 



: ■' "i p C 

3* rt co CO 

D. rt 

f*." ~ M 

co' 1— 1 

o ^ 2 » 

2 S* o 

rt 3 ^ en 

O w 



P 5; o 

3 3> rt 
p. ►* rt 

rt' 3 

rt- 3-C 
3" P 
rt rt- 2". 

^ ^ ? 

PJX5 

3---0 



3 n 



PB 



2330 



co 



P 



cr£^2 

rt o 

2 -< 

3°» 

3 

rt- 3. co 

rt 3.- 3 

3. rt . rt 

O 3* 

3 3 

3 y 

rt*3 "3 

1 3 O 

3 O 

a X -» 

ft. a- ,2" 
**• rt « 
5" "^ 

O'rt rt' 
3 O 3 
ft 3 3' 



co p 3- o 

co " *•£ 
3 3- -1 ° 5'rt 

2- S^p 

rt co 3 o 3 

CO i- 1 rt rt rt- 

rt B.p2rt ^ 

On 3 w O 

"^O "<* •t ... 

3- O rt r+ 

3* o <~> rt>o rt 

£ 3^0 3 

0.C0 a 2 3 c« 



.. -S rt- 

o 2.3- 

1 rt ft! 

<<; 3* 

O 2. P 

^p ss 

3 rt 
rt rt 

^3 « 

"> rt >o 

„SO 

"O rt- 1 
P 5 Jf 

£•2,8. 

rt rt, rt. 

3 

rt "3 CO 



p 



3*2Lrt 



n 2ig:B. 
2. j- » 3 

^ cS ° 3S * 

-3^8 2 2. 

rt 3: Co -O rt g 
3 — ■ <0 p CO ** 

3 c* a 3^ co ,-■ 
2 S ?-P 3- 



rt P P - W 

?^3 3 
rt^^ 

t/^S-, 2 2" 

3 3"co 

rt rt rt 
3-p 'i -t 
rt rt 
3 ,3 *D-^ 
».» co'3 
O 3 rt w 
'-< 2.P 3 rt 

3 ^SS 3' 

rt rt rt 

p eu- 3* 

rt rt. ft, 

o S5 ft-" 1 
3 rt g 

3 P ~ rt 

- to ^ O 
-- rt 



^ 3 



|3 



3- rt 

J?. P 
•"> rt 

3* 

cr_ 
rt 3- 



2 o 



P P P 

5'o' !r 
3 3 o 



3- 3 S 3 
rt •^ 1 . co 

s-1p 



p 



3 3 rt3 5 S' 
T3 >rt rt- <! ~ 



P CO 



I (D 3- rt, 



M h3 

cj-3- 
rt rt 
rt. co 
O rt 

o 



2 2 

1/3 H 

H rt 

W to 

CI O) 

n "^ 

l-H O 

O ~ 

z rt 

•» s 

^ 5 

o ° 

w g 

M CO 

f 3 

r 2 

t-H 3 

2 3 

^ g 

O 3 

C re 

H » 

o 2 

S E 

H 1 

>Tj *3 

w o 



<? rt 1 ._ 

7 O co t/3 . 

rt J s ^ 
STtrrt S H 

3 1 S! 1 

3* co 

O "3 co ^j ' 

3 S 3 ' ^ 

y 5 - 3i « 

rt 3 rt < r+ 

rt x 2 1. 

IP^ rt 

3 O rt^ « 

b-Sss: g 



3 3 



m. 



3-rt 2 
rt P 



^d 



~ 



1 H 



p 


t/3 


" 











P 






rt 


< 


2. 





3* 


a* 


■o 


3 


3 


p 


rt, 






U 


rr 


3 


rt 


rt 


rt 
3 


'< 








CO 





C/C 
3^ 



P3 

XoS" o' 

P 3*3 

3 rt O- 3 

3.3- * 

3 n> g^ * «, 

o^tr * O 

3 Piaq * 8 

p rt 31 3 
3 *3 tS 

°-a *£-. Ji 

H-,0 ^3 3. 
3 p *CfQ O 

«o;^ 

O *&* S" 



rt cf to 
3 2. (I 
3. -• CO 



rt '-^ Ci. - • to 

3 ■"-* rt 

1' P>S ^ 



CO 1— 



O # 1 rt 

>< rt rt 3* 

rt #35 O 

r 1 o 

*i a* 



to 

rtS" •? 



rt 



rt co U. 

3"'<; p 

K *rt 3 — 

2 *g "S. w 

°* 3,0 rt 

1 3 3 rt 

3:rt 3 

Cu rt, o 

OOrt 3 *» 

- X "3 rt rt 

rt. p 31 p o 



3 rt 



3_P JH 

3 rt T3 rt 

^g- o p 

oq g o. 

3 3 ^ 

33 rt 3. (^ 

3*3 2. 

v: n crq to 

2o O 

<->'>o co 3 

rt.^ 3- rt« 

PJ ^ P 3 

3 „- 33 "^ 

O 
co * 

3-_ 
p J+ * 



2.t73 

3 M 



^3 
rt 3 'rt^ 



o. P o 



ZT.O 

3 ^ 

rt p 
3 



S 3 



o « 
3oo 



§>1 
rt rt 14 



rt t73 



P. § 



- 1 W 

^ rt Q 
p w 

££. D. o 
rt " Sj 



!^ s! rt 3. 



2 ."o 1, 



rt \_. -I 
3T 1 rt> 



O "" 

ti p 

2 s 
1 

ro 



p 



p 



co 3- 

rt. S -, 
3 co 2. rt, 

P CO S^g 

a. rt rt.g, 

rt rt 3 1 
S. rt 

3 O g.3. 
a. 3 rt co 

rt rt- " 

Z?. P 



3 3' co 



«. 3 



CO 

O oj 

3 3 

3 a. 
p 

2". o 

3 3 

P "O 

co P 



*3 _ 

rt 3 '- 
3.0 

CO Jrt CO 

3 3 33 W 
3- n> 3* < 
3' 3 O rt 

rt 3 1 1 

W 3 "< 

»2-% 



o 2. 



rt 3 



p - 
a. 



Cu P 



o P> 



3-3-.1 

co co 

rt) rt rt 
p P 3 



s ^ 



rt rt 

3 p 
i' 3. 

rt rt 

-°*o 

3 * 

O 
p rt 

SS- 5' 
P 



O 

a* ■-* 

rt 13 



rt-2 - r 

2 S rt-5' 

r« ° ^ rt 

23S2: 

rt CO 

rt- rt- ^ rt- 

O rt < p 

3. O rt 

r-i- o rt 

rt co 1 Si 

P rt 

C/2P 3*rt 



P 



td3. 



S 3 
<: 3' 
rt «<; 



a* o 3- 



<< p 






3* 

rt - 



« l2 

r, rt- 1 

3 

rt. 1 
CT rt _ 

P O 2. 



3 3"- 

3 Ct"? rt 3- 



3' rt/ a. rt 



rt n> o 



3- td co 



• rt 2 
6 § S2. 

"3 rtj 
co PL O P 

rt rt . rt 

P rt 5 33 
C\ 3 o.p 
3 'X co rt . 
Crq co - ft 



rt 2 



3* 

O rt 

" 3. 

rt ro 

2 

^p* 
_ 3 
3-?r 



rt 2. 

rt 3' 
P 

tdrt" 

O rt 
P -> 
1 
3-33 

2,2. 

K3 
rt 

p rt, 
3* o 
3T 1 

S-^ 

P 3* 
33 rt 



s- rt- 



p'3 » 



S-S: 
rt 2- 3 

3 -—oq 



2 2 ?. 



o 

3 



^ o 2 

3 3 3 

3 3- 

rt P rt 
- 3 



CO rt. u 

3*5; 2. ~ 

P 3 rt. vo 

31 M 2 ►"- 



o 

o 
t- 1 

c 



O 

X 



H 
> 
H 
M 

td 
O 

> 



a a 

O 

> 



x 




< 

i— i 

Q 

•J 

< 
i— i 

H 

CO 

Q 

i— i 
to 
O 

H 
H 
< 

O 

i— i 

fe 
i— i 

H 

W 
U 



H 
2 

W 
i— i 
h 
< 



a 

< 

2 



X! 

O 



O w 
-OX 

73" £ 

4» ^ 

*C w 

(CO 



4> O 



p 


en 




o 


Q 




ft 






H 


bO 




>> 


C 






+j 


o 




ctf 






u 


r/i 








ifi 




'/ 




a 


C 


<u 


a 


=! 


nl 


o 


u 


Q 


O 





Oh 



Ph 



Q 



S 



PQ 



c >> 



© 2 



a 

3 
O 
u 
o 

o 

4) en 

s g 



w C 



ft 



31BDy;jJ3D jo jpcq uo suoqanajsui asg -siujo; uiBjd in SISONOVia 31«JS p[noi[s suuptSAqj 

NOIXVdriDDO J° Hiauiams }oexo aqj, -pafiddns X[[nj3JED aq pjnoqs uoijeiujoju; jo man a'joa^- 



•}UBJJOdlUI XJ3A si 



a x 



QHO03S XN3NVHaad V SI SIHX— XNI HXIM A^IV^ 3XIHM 



rt-o n a* oO/^-cr"- m h, r-«>o n- >-*, hri a* ►ft.i. era <-•■<->►+> ►*. 

3 2 oo ^Hh-^rt 3 S'ji 2 cr s* o 7?o £ 3* ft 3 3a •"• ►** 

* if I J? 11 »|Is W? U U s j > h SlsssM'f > 

if- i i :^r s? usii i*r J 1- !*§ *J i .r s 

a- o £ 3- a ^ ;-• o $• 3 2 o n tfS - o M *• W«;rta-ftp33 , oM,_j 

ft 3 5 S^2' Sb-^S ?£ 3^Sj p a 3 n> < *• rt2.>3S£a.3-rt3*<! w 

3 s p <t> t ?; nT "> £ £T ^3 „ - 5 2 2 « * "> ft *o a- o a 2 o. 3 3 o ft ft 

£■ ft." Ph^.'-^o«-s2". S^C"" h* ° a 3 ^ 3. _» - a' 3 - "* ~ 5 3 

crg§: *£ CSV 3 *.* 1 S&S-s-l 3 go g^? B "J" S g laP^ " 

2\P 2. 3-S ^BS< SE.B F& 5" 5 3 ft£. < P en 3">g 3 3.^3 2. £ 

22° 3 so^g^^a^ ^">^"^ s. rj^ * o -t ftp ■" ft i« 2 3 1; J^ 

>° 3 i-r o Q- S. O- ^SC rt aflfll 5^1 3* 3 rt Eh * S, 333 n' n rtW? ^ 



T3 


a; 




PS 


a 






ft 






05 




O 


re 




a 


3 


*ll 




r-Y 


a 


P 


_,. 


rt 


3 


; — ! 


<_ 


CL3 


0' 




01 


C 


3' 


01 


en 


a 


30 


in 


p 





a 


•<: 


O 






3 


p' 


S''" 3 




fD 


fa 


Q- 
cn 


(3. 

3 


5' 


rt 


n 


3 



n> fD 



O-S 2 o" a v ^g.3i» a, 3 o 2 R ft E 3 ft 33 g 33-5, a,-*.. 

n 2o*a o^ So— <°— 3— a. 25 o S^*3-J : t- tr ft ft fj S' w piSn i_i 

ggr^ b 5 - 3 &sr 2rgg-3 5 -° -5*«|w 2 3. §.3.*' g e s- § § • E^g-§. e. ° 

-^ Ills IV ^SS-gS 3.R3I-S* 8 -«S.,R ^ p ^^ Wff" 9 H 



o c 



SfKniSS: a r& i S: ^ '5°?! 



rrn >" . ^ ?T cr "ia^^fDOi cn,J PrtSf-i-(~i a* ►— 3 li (I 3" isa^^crs^-,—. !_=( 

Won 30 n2 C/0„» fiS2. 2. rt O ^ m c,n,3 » a- is, fi ^'"'Sv S ?. /-sM 

■ fto ftis3" 3^ w ft>< <-> (Tacr^; frg o 2 S O hrl 

Haain.^ D.—^^oij^- n ag^^gEiaCugL f^W 



o p ^o w «• o . S - rt rt S s- ^ > 









w g*^ cr P- rt «'2L» o o ^ »•-" a ^§ <■ 2 - Sft 3 _ « 3 3. K3 s S »■ w 

go c^fa^ g8 o^otr^BnH " • xflfr ^ M ft 28 -o ^^ > 

S 8;ftg"- rtrt ?ff ^Iff^gp? "Ug S ~B" 2. I °* BRg- „ l^s-cr ^ 

° ^S^^Oa - ' St *™ 0-3 3 3-^g • 0fQ o oi& a- gft a B.fr'rttO ffi 

U o r »5 ,s -^°5'o ^ft3-3-o.^ §3 ig p^p a 2 n S.o 1 "^ 



a h+,o f 

> ~'o W 'fa 05 0;»5" P 3- p o--" 3*^ Sft3*" H. P 03 rn 

f) 2 r, -S ^ ft 3 rjoftft—fD a.- ft o ft * oi hrl ►"* a a 2 

•" h.. a a2s_^ ~ft ft p,* 3 02 ° ^o3fi 



co ^3- n O a g. 



Si 








3T 


p 




a* 






3T 




IT) 


B. 








in 


re 

N 

a 


5' 
O 
rt 


3- 

n 


O 

n 




n 


a 


c 


a « 




pj 


4 




re 


C3 


a- a 



ft3,"3ft>0<->3*Sa ^ n „ » OP _ 3.T) rK"3 2. 

Ci.ftOhi3r.S^2B Pfta-^^~X3 rtCX a -S^, O 3-T? „ MS 3- 

03*3.coS^^oi K<3-3-0 ^ S 1 ft ft^ 3 3 ■% 3T a (TO 

33 m g^^w,, oftft^rsS «< " ^ £: 3-- ^ °< ^ ^ rt W 



? lirf 'i&is? Hnlpi si r ? I? & -*■ & |b| 

«_J «•, -.3 3 ,B > P <" ^ 3-ftsrrt3*!r a-p JS. 3.ft> oi ,„ X ac^o 

^ C50ft,S cn Ort.co rt . Oo^ oi rta- a to"- rt JiL^j rt 3a 

SOa2^--!uft 3acort»> -<ft pCTQ p CrH P r+rt3. 

o 3 B.ff C -^ O a 5. p 5 O S 3*£o rtO = £:.03r n P3* » 3*^3 

S.7n3-3c-.3»<;oi &-.-' 1 airt3:ht, CL3 ? D-a>3- rt 33rt P rti°«l 



< 
W 
to 
i— i 

Q 

A 
< 

H 

CO 

P 
t— t 

O 

w 

< 
O 

I— i 

fe 
t— t 

H 

W 
U 



H 

w 

H 

< 

ft 

O 
2 



u 


6 




o 






O 


a 


oo 


6 




>> 


o 


to 


c 




at) 


<u 


m 






.3 


-1 


O 



a 



fi 6 3 



Q 



co 






« 


.3 




< 


ii 




C3 


lo 




o 


o 




t— 1 






H 


>» 




« 


4-* 




< 


3 
3 




^ 


O 




J 


u 




< 






O 












H 






CO 

H 


o 




< 


o 
O 


"3 s 


co 




8 9 

O D 


W 




£ 




T3.c 


< 


u 
buD 


£ * 


J 


< 


■o'S 


< 




4) g 


fc 




l-c - - / 


u 




rt *0 


CO 




ES 


ft 


X 
V 
CO 


V o 

M> 
313 

"co 



I i 

a o 

3 



Ph 



a I 



E 

W 



J 



3 >• 





a, 




■z 




o 


t/> 


u 


c 


O 


o 





ft 



< 



co 



>H 



S 3 

c o 



2 G 



> 
O 



3 
.3 

E 
o 

b2 

3 



3 

m 
S 

E 

u 

m 

X 

X 
H 

< 

HI 

o 

Q 

< 

O 

a 
H 
< 

co 



aiBDyqjsa jo jpsq uo suopDnaisui 3Dg -SUIJ3} u;B[d ui SISONOVIQ 3 1^) S pinoqs suBiois.Cqj 
•juEiJodiu; X.J3A si NOIlVdnDDO J° luamajuis joexa sqj^ •p3i[ddns AjinpjEo aq ppoqs uoijeiujoju; jo uia^i Ajsaji — - g - >j 

QHOOaH J.N3NVHH3d V SI SIHX— XNI HXIM A7NIV^ 3XIHM 



~o os- coders- 2.t*>S"S. s- o^r/ > & E*3 3/2. 5* > 

Eft 3 £ "> o„t) 2.2^^ 3 3oC Z !i| ^ -_: Spa ^ 

% a'2 1 Sr^-Ofo^ ^2e.S „-? ft ^ « > 3 « 2 m ? ^ f, 2-.^ — » £ 

3 3 S§a 2 ft * § £ 3 ^ 3* 3 p 3 ^ £ &•«< oQ Q G a^^nSTQ ° 

^VS: S'w* I i 3 *2 3'"^o oS ff H ?» H 3g |o ^ ^?|S.i H 

«S3 <**$, S°l' gSg^s.5 ** £g" § I o§ fC-S c ?*"" § I 

^2 3- 3 l 2?T,3 ^^2^ I-" 1 2 3 3 3 i? P 8 & ^ ^2 3 " S-.5 S3 m 



►O "O 




pi 


>-l 























3 


3 


hi 






•-I 


P 

3 


3J 


< 


0.3 







en 


c 


3 


in 


in 


3. 

3 


BO 




P 






§>■§ g-oS S«<5 q !i «? S- B .B. s .g' " -gpSq S S ^d.:.fffi»a^ £ 

Sio.?- ^~ » »5 2 2.^.^1-2 2 ^0.3 s 2 ~ ^3 3- ►? _ s-3 3 o „, g _ „. 3/ « 



Hi. iilxzzTi aMi? a *l»l*o g fish's* 

3_. 3 3-3 ?Sg-So'§ ^<"~% 2 s. |a»* g ~ s- S ss|as- ^ 

gg-s b- r S|-g;"| |1^a-^ s ^^a,*Eo ° " 8- ^ w^* o 2 

IsPb* SlM-ia l!l!-!l -iH: I l l* w^lf 8 B 

■ — r 2-^^o^CO ^ ^"" P0 2.- » S? 5 ' 



3 


K* 


1_L 


3 3 






2 3 











p 




c 


P-H. 


in 


P-T3 
3 


O 


in 

►O to 


>+i 


^ 3^ 





w-. 1 


O 


f> 


-1 






P 


n> 


S- 


< 




ta 


n 







M 


-t 






<"*- 


^ ^ 






</> 


ff. c 


P 




5' 


2 3 

3 0- 


p 


hd 

p 


uq 




n> 


to 



^g^gg-ssigS. sH^Sftl^ffs h «■ >^^l & ,* s ?§.§■ SSI's ^ ^ 

« n o ^Q.tJg'S 2 8 "Off -Sn H - • S^n ^ w J 2» ^ g > 

' Si 3 S2 « p 3----ft 3 s:« c "> o » r p 5 M 2 ^S^-o « S on ■ S, gg3 o i-3 

* o ^„ , ? 5to-«S.i|- g-^ > • « §S ; 3- 8s- 3 3pft *o ffi 

s^ tu O i-t- 5 0c30 o >-ff..n a it ft^r 1 -- 1 |J i-r- as. — ►+. ►— ■ a Fn » 



(KlH.j'J j3g^* oftftS^ ?„ 31 £2.0 O r*^ a /* < 

1 . S H 2 u ~ in k ir to « 1 bL3 ►*■ o>aw3 «i "rn 



3 B. 

w o § 


w 

a 


5 


3 3 


*\3 




•O ft 3. 


o 


p 


3* 3 




3 


^ n "<? 


to* 


<<l 


Cfl q 


o 




c>'*0 <* 


3 


P 


■-■^ 3^ 
P P 


5" 


ft 


3 rr — 


op 


5 


o 




3 



a> 



2 ^y w o^ °5?s!ff> o§ eg P^iTS- a n ^ |-o 

W £.^S"L w o 3*3 3 o'c S w g. c ^o* 3 ETs 5«.^ 

h D.2 H >SunB' +1 " ""fttJaftPrt, - o ^ a« S2. -tcr 

- r -:?%po^ s 5&.st- ?r |-ft I -ft * g: w ^ ^ ft 3 s 

.?.ftP- a ft23 p _ ? |o?5 «& 

w S.1 "^oS'S"-a °8s» w .gB§" eI * &&W ° wft 3 §fto 




« s-3^ =sts 2 nffSgS dft ^ B8» "" K£ « 3( ?-3 

"§S« I- 3 5-S ^oS s^ £ro 3- 3 E- S- S ^ o -p. 3 

ftR w p cn S.p ft2 °> ^32 « s-o^ ^ •-S'o 

SfiSs^'S O 3-3 ft ^^ rv 2 2 

flfljj 2.2o ft3 3 n^^ O- " 31 23: w' 

O P O n- S, » n aha in 3 " >-■ co 9 3g 

sis-"** 5" | a 3 » s 2. | g.^ g B g | 

IJS? ££2. 8.1" ? 1:3.1: g ^ S g"js ^ 



o 


EJ 






n 


3 


g 




3/ 





3" 


3* 


■o 


3 


3 


P 


►+. 






O 


rr 


3 


-: 


CD 


3 


•< 



PRINTERS 



AVOID 

AVOID L) 



HfttiSKTION 

J L I U it 1010 J 

RQiSONING 



CONSUMPTION causes 29 out of every 100 deaths among printers. Stagnant air, r'umes, gases, 
lead poisoning, lack of exercise, and forgetting to breath deeply (100 times each day) are the main 
reasons. 

d over linotype METAL POTS, and have pipes connecting, and leading out 

lead of type. Handle it as little as pos- 

Drop pig-lead carefully into melting pot. SPLASHINGS of molten lead dry later and become lead 



Hoods must be pi; 
of doors. 

Remember, pig-lead used in LINOTYPING is softer th 
sible. Then keep fingers away from mouth and lip: 



i order to blend MOLTEN LEAD better. It will blend of itself. 

be cleaned in the work room. Clean them 



insist that FLOORS 

smooth, WASHABLE 
an be cleaned by moist 
e legs high enough to 



dust. 

Do not shake crucible 

PLUNGERS on linotype machines should 
boxes in the open air. Avoid inhaling the dust. 

GRAPHITE used for lubricating is not poisonous, but all dust is irritating to the lungs. 

Avoid LEAD DUST, as much as possible, when trimming and mitreing, or when sawing. 

Remove LEAD DUST from type cases in the open air, or by means of a vacuum cleaner. 

Never put TYPE into the mouth, or moisten fingers to get hold of type. 

Benzine and other cleaners occasionally contain DEADLY POISONS, which poison if gotten 
onto the skin or when inhaled. 

Insist upon having GOOD VENTILATION in the office or factory, an 
SHOULD NOT BE SWEPT during working hours. 

S,. ss . = , .» ;.-,., „m r loj,»,- that ,,,=.113 ana CCill„ S o =< w^rk room if not ot 

SURFACE, should be lime-washed once a year; that close-fitting floors which 
methods are desirable; and that type-cases should fit closely on the floor, or h; 
brush under. 

Eat a good breakfast before beginning work. Food in the stomach, especially MILK, helps to 
prevent lead-poisoning. 

Do not eat FOOD or use TOBACCO, while at work, until you have washed your hands, because of 
the danger of actually feeding lead to yourself. Do not use a "common" DRINKING CUP; such a 
cup may be employed by a tuberculous or otherwise infected person. Wash hands thoroughly with 
warm water and soap. Have your own towel and soap. Rinse the mouth and clean the fingernails 
before eating. Don't use fingernails for TOOTHPICKS. 

Don"t spit on the floor. Use CUSPIDORS and see that they are cleaned daily. 

Eat your LUNCH outside of the work room. 

Do not wear WORKING CLOTHES too long without change. 

Hang STREET CLOTHES where they will not be exposed to the dust of the work room. 

Gas and electric lights should be shaded to prevent a glare. The EYES should be EXAMINED 
from time to time by a competent physician. Avoid ruining your sight by giving early attention to 
eye-strain. Headaches, blurred vision, red and inflamed eyes, dancing spots before the eyes, twitching 
of the eye-lids, are some of the first signs of eye-strain. 

Insufficient LIGHT may impair the general health. 

BATHE frequently, and brush the TEETH each night. 

Avoid ALCOHOL. It increases the danger of lead-poisoning. 

Have a good BOWEL MOVEMENT each day. 

EXERCISE in the fresh air as much as possible. 

BE EXAMINED BY A DOCTOR occasionally to protect 
yourself against the effects of your trade. 



ISSUED JANUARY, 1916 
Division of Industrial Hygiene 

Ohio State Board of Health 

E. F. McCAMPBELL. Ph.D.. M.D. 
COLUMBUS. OHIO 



Instructions to 

in Dusty Trades 

DANGERS OF DUST 

1. Don't breathe dust of any 
kind — it causes colds, con- 
sumption and pneumonia. 

2. Don't sweep during working 
hours — it spreads germs of all 
kinds. 

3. Don't work in dusty air. Stop 
the dust or wear a dust pro- 
tector over your mouth and 
nose. 

4. Dust breathed into your lungs 
is never breathed out again. 

5. If you breathe dust you are 
bound to cough. 

6. Coughing or spitting is na- 
ture's warning that your lungs 
are in danger. 

7. If you hem or cough every 
day see a doctor at once. 

OHIO STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 

E. F. McCampbell. Ph.D.. M.D. 

Secretary and Executive Officer 



NPtlffi g|SJRUCTIONS TO EMPLOYES 
HOW TO PREVENT LEAD POISONING 



(1) All workers exposed to lead dusts, lead fumes, lead solutions and lead 


compounds are 


liable to poisoning. These poisons get into the body 


through the nos 


e while breathing, or through the mouth when chewing, 


or swallowing, t 


>r wetting the lips. 


(2) Do all you can , 


:o keep down dust. When sweeping or cleaning, always 


dampen with w 


ater, oil or wet sawdust. Where dust can not be kept 


down, you must 


: wear a respirator. This must be cleaned out at least 


once a day. 




(3) Eat breakfast before going to work. Drink milk at meals, and if pos- 


sible once betwt 


:en meals. Do not eat meals in workroom. Leave work- 



(4) Keep dirty fingers out of your mouth, and off of your food, and what- 
ever goes into your mouth. Wash hands, arms and face with warm 
water and soap before eating, going to the toilet, or quitting the work- 
room. Clean your lips and rinse out your mouth before eating or 

(5) A musracrie, if worn, must be kept short. Do not wear a beard. Keep 
fingernails clean and cut short, also loose skin about the nails or hands. 

(6) Do not chew toiacco or gum while at work. Avoid the use of intoxi- 
cants in any form, as they promote lead poisoning. 

(7) Take a full bath with warm water and soap at least twice a week. 

(8) You must wear overalls and jumpers while at work. Wear a cap if ex- 
posed to dust or fumes. Do not wear your working clothes outside of 
the working place. 

(9) Keep your bowels moving if possible once a day. Report to your lore- 
man if you notice (1) loss of appetite, (2) poor sleep, (3) indigestion, 
(4) continual constipation, (5) vomiting, (6) pains in stomach, (7) diz- 
ziness, (8) continual headache, or (9) weakness in arms, limbs or body. 

NOTE: Lead poisoning brings on Paralysis of the wrists and arms, 
hardens the arteries, causes chronic diseases, and hastens old age and death. 
WORKMAN PROTECT YOURSELF. Your employer and the Board of 
Health cannot do all for you. OBSERVE THE ABOVE PRECAUTIONS. 

OHIO STATE BOARD OF HEALTH, 

E. F. McCAMPBELL, Ph.D., M.D., 
Columbus, Ohio. Secretary and Executive Officer. 



PAINTERS 



Avoid Lead 






MOST PAINTS, FlMtEKS^AND 
SOME DRYERS CONTAIN LEAD 



It gets in through the i 



mouth. He 



i not to touch your food 



■ you ( 



Otherwise 



Lead does not get into the body through the 
it should be easy to avoid lead poisoning. 

Furthermore, 19 out of every 100 deaths among painters are due to CONSUMPTION. Twice as 
many painters die of consumption as carpenters. Undoubtedly working with poisons causes the dif- 
ference. Poisons predispose to consumption. 

Eat a good breakfast before beginning work. A FULL STOMACH lessens the danger of lead 
poisoning. 

MILK is the best antidote for lead. Drink it at lunch or during the day. 

Do not put food or tobacco into your mouth with dirty FINGERS. In other words, do not feed 
lead to yourself. 

RINSE OFF LIPS before eating or drinking. Keep mustache short so < 
or drink. A mustache is a danger since it collects dust. 

Wash HANDS thoroughly with warm water and soap before eating when 
hold sandwiches, pie, etc., between clean pieces of paper. 

Eat your LUNCH outside of the room or place where painting or sanding is done. 

Keep fingernails clean. Do not use them for TOOTHPICKS. 

It is a good plan to rinse out your mouth before eating or drinking. 

When sanding avoid breathing the DUST or allowing it to settle on your lips. Wear some sort 
of a respirator which will keep you from breathing the dust. 

While SANDING do not chew tobacco or gum. The chewing movements always cause a little 
swallowing which YOU DO NOT NOTICE. Licking the lips, chewing and this "little swallowing" 
causes the most of lead poisoning. 

Do not moisten your lips with your tongue. Each time you lick in some lead particles which have 
settled on your lips. 

uch as possible. Look out for dirty, dusty drop-cloths. Do not shake them.- 
nding with a little MINERAL OIL present to absorb the dust. Such oil is 
almost any kind of work, 
i outside POCKETS where dust collects. Such dust usually contains some 



Preve nt DUST ; 

When possible do s. 

cheap and can be used oi 

Do not put tobacco i 



lead. 

Brush your TEETH at least in the morning and at night, the latter before going to bed. 

Avoid ALCOHOLIC DRINKS — they make you more liable to lead poisoning. 

Do not use a dirty cloth or rag to wipe off your face, nose or lips. 

Have a good BOWEL MOVEMENT each day — best time is just after breakfast. Make the 
habit regular. 

Hang street CLOTHES away from the paint and dust of the work place. 

Have overalls and jumpers washed at least once a week. 

Painters should get a good bath at least once a week, and use plenty of SOAP. 

Remember also that all DRYERS and PAINT REMOVERS are very poisonous. Do not breathe 
their fumes or odors in a closed-up space. Have good ventilation. 

TURPENTINE damages the kidneys sooner or later. 

BE EXAMINED BY A DOCTOR OCCASIONALLY. 

SYMPTOMS: 

Have you ever had rheumatism, kidney, stomach, or heart trouble? Each may be due to lead. 
Some SYMPTOMS of actual LEAD POISONING:— 
Cramps in stomach or bowels Pains in joints or back 

Constipation Numbness of arms or finge 

Bluish lines on gums Weakness of wrist or toe 

Diarrhoea Acting strangely 

Nausea Tremors 

Foul taste in mouth Dizziness or dizzy spells 

Severe headache Nervousness 

Loss of weight Pallor 

Loss of strength Wrist-drop 6r "palsy" 



ISSUED JAfN 



1916 



Division of Industrial Hygiene 
OHIO STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 

E. F. McCAMPBELL. Ph.D.. M.D. 
S«cr«lary *«* E.eculive Offictr 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 



II. AVOID DANGERS TO HEALTH — Know What They Are. Here are some 
of them and their limits: 

1. The AIR in most buildings heated by stoves, furnaces, steam or hot water is 

stagnant, too hot and too dry — dryer than that of the Sahara Desert. 
Hence sore throats, colds, and many forms of sickness. 

GOOD AIR: 

CIRCULATES — and by so doing tones up the human system by striking 
the skin, thus improving the blood-flow, and removing the "envelope of 
heat" which is given off by the body and constantly surrounds it. Use 
electric fans or cloth-windows or window-boards or ventilators. A just 
perceptible "breath" is enough (or air blowing 5 to 10 feet per second). 
Has RELATIVE HUMIDITY of 45 to 65%. Learn the use of the wet- 
bulb thermometer. When not too cold, proper moisture can be had by 
admitting outdoor air (note cloth-windows). It may take 10 to 20 gallons 
of water per day for a six-room house. Few, if any, pan and water schemes 
will evaporate this amount of water. 

Has a TEMPERATURE (indoors) of from 60 to 68° F. This temperature 
feels perfectly comfortable when the air is properly moistened — it also 
saves on the coal bill. 

Has no irritating FLOATING PARTICLES — dust, smoke, etc. 
Has no noticeable GASES, FUMES OR VAPORS — these are especially 
dangers of modern industries. Any ODOR should be pleasant — the air 
should be just like that supplied by Nature. 

Not POLLUTED by disease germs. Most so-called "air-borne diseases" 
are really caught by contact with, or close approach to, persons carrying 
the germs. Such "carriers" may not themselves be sick and also may be in 
total ignorance of their own menace. Avoid touching persons as much as 
possible. Keep beyond the breathing range, and, finally, wash your hands 
often to prevent carrying disease to your face and mouth. 

2. GOOD ILLUMINATION means: 

STEADY LIGHT from over the shoulders — 5-10 foot-candles of ARTI- 
FICIAL light for ordinary eye work, 5 f. c. in foundries and similar p^ces, 
and^ f. c. on the floors of general workrooms. Daylight COLOR is the 
best. DAYLIGHT should be three times stronger than artificial light. 
(A foot-candle is the amount of light given by a standard candle one foot 
away). 

Absence of sharp contrasts of lights and shadows; have light-colored walls 
and ceilings to reflect light instead of absorbing it; unobstructed light, as 
from the upper half of windows — dirty windows may obstruct 4/5 of the 
light, while dark shades should not be used in workrooms, offices, or 
schools; protection of the eyes against brilliant and hot lights. 

GOOD EYE-SIGHT — perhaps, after all, your eye-sight is defective and 
your eyes need examining — most headaches are from eyestrain — eyestrain 
may be as fatiguing, also, as the most arduous work. 

3. POISONS. Workers with poisons should be properly instructed in their use. 

The COURTS have decided that the responsibility of such instruction 
rests upon the employer. In Ohio the State Department of Health stands 
prepared to issue INSTRUCTIONS for the avoidance of poisoning of all 
sorts. Most poisonings occur because employers and workers both CON- 
SIDER the substances dealt with as too innocent to cause much harm. 
This attitude has unfortunately caused an immense amount of sickness, 
numerous deaths, and many LAW SUITS for large amounts of money. The 
State Laboratories will analyze suspected poisons used in connection with 
work, provided the sources, uses and reasons for the analyses are stated. 
The Department of Health will also supply INFORMATION as to the 
maximum amount of poisonous substances which can be present in the air 
or may be taken into the system without causing symptoms — This insofar 
as it has information or can secure the same. By law, all instances of pois- 
oning in connection with work must be brought TO THE NOTICE of the 
State Department of Health, which Department furnishes the proper blanks 
for recording the information and investigates the occurrence with a view 
to finding out how to avoid similar mishaps. Such reports cannot be used 
as evidence of the facts therein in any action arising out of the disease 



therein reported. Most poisonings occur through workers poisoning them- 
selves, which is due to IGNORANCE or DISREGARD of instructions, but 
upon the employer rests the responsibility of supervision. The more 
COMMON POISONS used in the State of Ohio are about in order of their 
frequency of use and their liability to produce occupational disease: lead, 
benzine and benzol (naphtha, petrol, gasoline, etc.), turpentine and similar 
dryers, brass or zinc in the form of fumes; acids, alkalis, wood alcohol, 
anilin oil, carbon bisulphide, antimony, illuminating and fuel gas, sulphur- 
ated hydrogen, arsenic, phosphorus and mercury. 

4. FATIGUE. A tired feeling is nature's warning to rest. Getting tired de- 

pends largely upon who you are and how well you may be. Work should 
promote health and a sense of well-being. "So tired" should never be heard 
at the end of a day's work, as it signifies exhaustion. All straining or 
heavy or rapid work should be tempered or subjected to changes so that no 
feeling of exhaustion results. This applies to the eyes, or to the hands, as 
well as to the whole body. True "Scientific Management" observes these 
principles and makes use of several methods of doing routine work. On 
the other hand, TOO LITTLE EXERCISE is a serious danger to large 
numbers of persons who are not actively employed. Variation, which will 
allow exercise, is the secret of efficiency and steadfastness. The best stand- 
ard for fatigue or inactivity is that "tired feeling". Avoid it. 

5. TEMPERATURE. The exposure to heat produces thermic fever if the tem- 

perature goes beyond that of the human body (98.6°) ; beyond this, prostra- 
tions, muscular cramps and anemia are produced. Premature old age is a 
common result. When COMBINED WITH MOISTURE the effects upon 
the health are very much worse. For the best work, neither the wet nor 
dry thermometer should exceed 70 u F. The shower-bath is a most excellent 
way to control the circulation of the blood upon quitting the hot work- 
place preparatory to going outside. In almost all trades heat can be con- 
trolled or kept away from workmen. EXPOSURE TO COLD, pure and 
simple, is not dangerous to health provided enough clothing is worn and 
enough active work is performed. Cooling one part of the body while 
heating another is bad. 

6. DIRT AND DISORDERED SURROUNDINGS are dangerous to health 

because they favor disease, obstruct light, make one less inclined to do a 
high class of work; also to observe health standards, correct habits and 
good morals, whether at home, at work, or elsewhere. 

7. THE NATURAL DESIRES create great risks to health — 

1. THIRST must be supplied with safe drinking water. 

2. HUNGER must be supplied with clean, nourishing food eaten in a place 
free from poisons. 

3. TOILETS, URINALS, SEWERAGE and GARBAGE devices must not 
engender disease. 

4. SLEEP must not be disturbed and must last eight hours every night. 

5. RECREATION must not be dissipative but recreative. 

6. The desire for STIMULANTS is always abnormal to the healthy person; 
when present it is usually due to the effects of some of the dangers above 
cited or to a habit acquired through ignorance or bravado. Stimulants 
include alcohol, coffee, tea and certain drugs. 

7. Make the day the routine of life — don't try to catch up on Sundays only. 

IV. THE LAST FACTOR in the cure of this national health decline is that of pro- 
viding for the cases of sickness which occur. It is THE RELIEF 
SCHEME. Just as we have accident insurance in order to compensate for 
accidents we should have sickness insurance in order to compensate for 
sickness. It is best to call this "HEALTH INSURANCE" for we wish to 
maintain health. Such insurance is the real active agent in bringing per- 
sons to observe the Laws of Health, to have Physical Examinations made 
and to see that their Surroundings are Healthful. To bring this about the 
insurance should be supported by the worker (2/5), by the employer (2/5), 
and by the state (1/5). By this means every one is financially interested in 
prolonging health, increasing efficiency and maintaining a high standard of 
production. 

WORK SHOULD PROMOTE HEALTH, NOT DESTROY IT 



III. AVOID DANGERS TO HEALTH — Know What They Are. Here are some 
of them and their limits: 

1. The AIR in most buildings heated by stoves, furnaces, steam or hot water is 

stagnant, too hot and too dry — dryer than that of the Sahara Desert. 
Hence sore throats, colds, and many forms of sickness. 

GOOD AIR: 

CIRCULATES — and by so doing tones up the human system by striking 
the skin, thus improving the blood-flow, and removing the "envelope of 
heat" which is given off by the body and constantly surrounds it. Use 
electric fans or cloth-windows or window-boards or ventilators. A just 
perceptible "breath" is enough (or air blowing 5 to 10 feet per second). 
Has RELATIVE HUMIDITY of 45 to 65'/. Learn the use of the wet- 
bulb thermometer. When not too cold, proper moisture can be had by 
admitting outdoor air (note cloth-windows). It may take 10 to 20 gallons 
of water per day for a six-room house. Few, if any, pan and water schemes 
will evaporate this amount of water. 

Has a TEMPERATURE (indoors) of from 60 to 68° F. This temperature 
feels perfectly comfortable when the air is properly moistened — it also 
saves on the coal bill. 

Has no irritating FLOATING PARTICLES — dust, smoke, etc. 
Has no noticeable GASES, FUMES OR VAPORS — these are especially 
dangers of modern industries. Any ODOR should be pleasant — the air 
should' be just like that supplied by Nature. 

Not POLLUTED by disease germs. Most so-called "air-borne diseases" 
are really caught by contact with, or close approach to, persons carrying 
the germs. Such "carriers" may not themselves be sick and also may be in 
total ignorance of their own menace. Avoid touching persons as much as 
possible. Keep beyond the breathing range, and, finally, wash your hands 
often to prevent carrying disease to your face and mouth. 

2. GOOD ILLUMINATION means: 

STEADY LIGHT from over the shoulders — 5-10 foot-candles of ARTI- 
FICIAL light for ordinary eye work, 5 f. c. in foundries and similar places, 
and ,3 f. c. on the floors of general workrooms. Daylight COLOR is the 
best. DAYLIGHT should be three times stronger than artificial light. 
(A foot-candle is the amount of light given by a standard candle one foot 
away). 

Absence of sharp contrasts of lights and shadows; have light-colored walls 
and ceilings to reflect light instead of absorbing it; unobstructed light, as 
from the upper half of windows — dirty windows may obstruct 4/5 of the 
light, while dark shades should not be used in workrooms, offices, or 
schools; protection of the eyes against brilliant and hot lights. 

GOOD EYE-SIGHT — perhaps, after all, your eye-sight is defective and 
your eyes need examining ■ — most headaches are from eyestrain — eyestrain 
may be as fatiguing, also, as the most arduous work. 

3. POISONS. Workers with poisons should be properly instructed in their use. 

The COURTS have decided that the responsibility of such instruction 
rests upon the employer. In Ohio the State Department of Health stands 
prepared to issue INSTRUCTIONS for the avoidance of poisoning of all 
sorts. Most poisonings occur because employers and workers both CON- 
SIDER the substances dealt with as too innocent to cause much harm. 
This attitude has unfortunately caused an immense amount of sickness, 
numerous deaths, and many LAW SUITS for large amounts of money. The 
State Laboratories will analyze suspected poisons used in connection with 
work, provided the sources, uses and reasons for the analyses are stated. 
The Department of Health will also supply INFORMATION as to the 
maximum amount of poisonous substances which can be present in the air 
or may be taken into the system without causing symptoms — This insofar 
as it has information or can secure the same. By law, all instances of pois- 
oning in connection with work must be brought TO THE NOTICE of the 
State Department of Health, which Department furnishes the proper blanks 
for recording the information and investigates the occurrence with a view 
to finding out how to avoid similar mishaps. Such reports cannot be used 
as evidence of the facts therein in any action arising out of the disease 



therein reported. Most poisonings occur through workers poisoning them- 
selves, which is due to IGNORANCE or DISREGARD of instructions, but 
upon the employer rests the responsibility of supervision. The more 
COMMON POISONS used in the State of Ohio are about in order of their 
frequency of use and their liability to produce occupational disease: lead, 
benzine and benzol (naphtha, petrol, gasoline, etc.), turpentine and similar 
dryers, brass or zinc in the form of fumes; acids, alkalis, wood alcohol, 
anilin oil, carbon bisulphide, antimony, illuminating and fuel gas, sulphur- 
ated hydrogen, arsenic, phosphorus and mercury. 

4. FATIGUE. A tired feeling is nature's warning to rest. Getting tired de- 

pends largely upon who you are and how well you may be. Work should 
promote health and a sense of well-being. "So tired" should never be heard 
at the end of a day's work, as it signifies exhaustion. All straining or 
heavy or rapid work should be tempered or subjected to changes so that no 
feeling of exhaustion results. This applies to the eyes, or to the hands, as 
well as to the whole body. True "Scientific Management" observes these 
principles and makes use of several methods of doing routine work. On 
the other hand, TOO LITTLE EXERCISE is a serious danger to large 
numbers of persons who are not actively employed. Variation, which will 
allow exercise, is the secret of efficiency and steadfastness. The best stand- 
ard for fatigue or inactivity is that "tired feeling". Avoid it. 

5. TEMPERATURE. The exposure to heat produces thermic fever if the tem- 

perature goes beyond that of the human body (98.6°) ; beyond this, prostra- 
tions, muscular cramps and anemia are produced. Premature old age is a 
common result. When COMBINED WITH MOISTURE the effects upon 
the health are very much worse. For the best work, neither the wet nor 
dry thermometer should exceed 70° F. The shower-bath is a most excellent 
way to control the circulation of the blood upon quitting the hot work- 
place preparatory to going outside. In almost all trades heat can be con- 
trolled or kept away from workmen. EXPOSURE TO COLD, pure and 
simple, is not dangerous to health provided enough clothing is worn and 
enough active work is performed. Cooling one part of the body while 
heating another is bad. 

6. DIRT AND DISORDERED SURROUNDINGS are dangerous to health 

because they favor disease, obstruct light, make one less inclined to do a 
high class of work; also to observe health standards, correct habits and 
good morals, whether at home, at work, or elsewhere. 

7. THE NATURAL DESIRES create great risks to health — 

1. THIRST must be supplied with safe drinking water. 

2. HUNGER must be supplied with clean, nourishing food eaten in a place 
free from poisons. 

3. TOILETS, URINALS, SEWERAGE and GARBAGE devices must not 
engender disease. 

4. SLEEP must not be disturbed and must last eight hours every night. 

5. RECREATION must not be dissipative but recreative. 

6. The desire for STIMULANTS is always abnormal to the healthy person; 
when present it is usually due to the effects of some of the dangers above 
cited or to a habit acquired through ignorance or bravado. Stimulants 
include alcohol, coffee, tea and certain drugs. 

7. Make the day the routine of life — don't try to catch up on Sundays only. 

IV. THE LAST FACTOR in the cure of this national health decline is that of pro- 
viding for the cases of sickness which occur. It is THE RELIEF 
SCHEME. Just as we have accident insurance in order to compensate for 
accidents we should have sickness insurance in order to compensate for 
sickness. It is best to call this "HEALTH INSURANCE" for we wish to 
maintain health. Such insurance is the real active agent in bringing per- 
sons to observe the Laws of Health, to have Physical Examinations made 
and to see that their Surroundings are Healthful. To bring this about the 
insurance should be supported by the worker (2/5), by the employer (2/5), 
and by the state (1/5). By this means every one is financially interested in 
prolonging health, increasing efficiency and maintaining a high standard of 
production. 

WORK SHOULD PROMOTE HEALTH, NOT DESTROY IT 



III. AVOID DANGERS TO HEALTH — Know What They Are. Here are some 
of them and their limits: 

1. The AIR in most buildings heated by stoves, furnaces, steam or hot water is 

stagnant, too hot and too dry — dryer than that of the Sahara Desert. 
Hence sore throats, colds, and many forms of sickness. 

GOOD AIR: 

CIRCULATES — and by so doing tones up the human system by striking 
the skin, thus improving the blood-flow, and removing the "envelope of 
heat" which is given off by the body and constantly surrounds it. Use 
electric fans or cloth-windows or window-boards or ventilators. A just 
perceptible "breath" is enough (or air blowing 5 to 10 feet per second). 
Has RELATIVE HUMIDITY of 45 to 65%. Learn the use of the wet- 
bulb thermometer. When not too cold, proper moisture can be had by 
admitting outdoor air (note cloth-windows). It may take 10 to 20 gallons 
of water per day for a six-room house. Few, if any, pan and water schemes 
will evaporate this amount of water. 

Has a TEMPERATURE (indoors) of from 60 to 68° F. This temperature 
feels perfectly comfortable when the air is properly moistened — it also 
saves on the coal bill. 

Has no irritating FLOATING PARTICLES — dust, smoke, etc. 
Has no noticeable GASES, FUMES OR VAPORS — these are especially 
dangers of modern industries. Any ODOR should be pleasant — the air 
should be just like that supplied by Nature. 

Not POLLUTED by disease germs. Most so-called "air-borne diseases" 
are really caught by contact with, or close approach to, persons carrying 
the germs. Such "carriers" may not themselves be sick and also may be in 
total ignorance of their own menace. Avoid touching persons as much as 
possible. Keep beyond the breathing range, and, finally, wash your hands 
often to prevent carrying disease to your face and mouth. 

2. GOOD ILLUMINATION means: 

STEADY LIGHT from over the shoulders — 5-10 foot-candles of ARTI- 
FICIAL light for ordinary eye work, 5 f. c. in foundries and similar p'aces. 
and ^ f. c. on the floors of general workrooms. Daylight COLOR is the 
best. DAYLIGHT should be three times stronger than artificial light. 
(A foot-candle is the amount of light given by a standard candle one foot 
away). 

Absence of sharp contrasts of lights and shadows; have light-colored walls 
and ceilings to reflect light instead of absorbing it; unobstructed light, as 
from the upper half of windows — dirty windows may obstruct 4/5 of the 
light, while dark shades should not be used in workrooms, offices, cr 
schools; protection of the eyes against brilliant and hot lights. 

GOOD EYE-SIGHT — perhaps, after all, your eye-sight is defective and 
your eyes need examining — most headaches are from eyestrain — eyestrain 
may be as fatiguing, also, as the most arduous work. 

3. POISONS. Workers with poisons should be properly instructed in their use. 

The COURTS have decided that the responsibility of such instruction 
rests upon the employer. In Ohio the State Department of Health stands 
prepared to issue INSTRUCTIONS for the avoidance of poisoning of all 
sorts. Most poisonings occur because employers and workers both CON- 
SIDER the substances dealt with as too innocent to cause much harm. 
This attitude has unfortunately caused an immense amount of sickness, 
numerous deaths, and many LAW SUITS for large amounts of money. The 
State Laboratories will analyze suspected poisons used in connection with 
work, provided the sources, uses and reasons for the analyses are stated. 
The Department of Health will also supply INFORMATION as to the 
maximum amount of poisonous substances which can be present in the air 
or may be taken into the system without causing symptoms — This insofar 
as it has information or can secure the same. By law, all instances of pois- 
oning in connection with work must be brought TO THE NOTICE of the 
State Department of Health, which Department furnishes the proper blanks 
for recording the information and investigates the occurrence with a view 
to finding out how to avoid similar mishaps. Such reports cannot be used 
as evidence of the facts therein in any action arising out of the disease 



therein reported. Most poisonings occur through workers poisoning them- 
selves, which is due to IGNORANCE or DISREGARD of instructions, but 
upon the employer rests the responsibility of supervision. The more 
COMMON POISONS used in the State of Ohio are about in order of their 
frequency of use and their liability to produce occupational disease: lead, 
benzine and benzol (naphtha, petrol, gasoline, etc.), turpentine and similar 
dryers, brass or zinc in the form of fumes; acids, alkalis, wood alcohol, 
anilin oil, carbon bisulphide, antimony, illuminating and fuel gas, sulphur- 
ated hydrogen, arsenic, phosphorus and mercury. 

4. FATIGUE. A tired feeling is nature's warning to rest. Getting tired de- 

pends largely upon who you are and how well you may be. Work should 
promote health and a sense of well-being. "So tired" should never be heard 
at the end of a day's work, as it signifies exhaustion. All straining or 
heavy or rapid work should be tempered or subjected to changes so that no 
feeling of exhaustion results. This applies to the eyes, or to the hands, as 
well as to the whole body. True "Scientific Management" observes these 
principles and makes use of several methods of doing routine work. On 
the other hand, TOO LITTLE EXERCISE is a serious danger to large 
numbers of persons who are not actively employed. Variation, which will 
allow exercise, is the secret of efficiency and steadfastness. The best stand- 
ard for fatigue or inactivity is that "tired feeling". Avoid it. 

5. TEMPERATURE. The exposure to heat produces thermic fever if the tem- 

perature goes beyond that of the human body (98.6°) ; beyond this, prostra- 
tions, muscular cramps and anemia are produced. Premature old age is a 
common result. When COMBINED WITH MOISTURE the effects upon 
the health are very much worse. For the best work, neither the wet nor 
dry thermometer should exceed 70° F. The shower-bath is a most excellent 
way to control the circulation of the blood upon quitting the hot work- 
place preparatory to going outside. In almost all trades heat can be con- 
trolled or kept away from workmen. EXPOSURE TO COLD, pure and 
simple, is not dangerous to health provided enough clothing is worn and 
enough active work is performed. Cooling one part of the body while 
heating another is bad. 

6. DIRT AND DISORDERED SURROUNDINGS are dangerous to health 

because they favor disease, obstruct light, make one less- inclined to do a 
high class of work; also to observe health standards, correct habits and 
good morals, whether at home, at work, or elsewhere. 

7. THE NATURAL DESIRES create great risks to health — 

1. THIRST must be supplied with safe drinking water. 

2. HUNGER must be supplied with clean, nourishing food eaten in a place 
free from poisons. 

3. TOILETS, URINALS, SEWERAGE and GARBAGE devices must not 
engender disease. 

4. SLEEP must not be disturbed and must last eight hours every night. 

5. RECREATION must not be dissipative but recreative. 

6. The desire for STIMULANTS is always abnormal to the healthy person; 
when present it is usually due to the effects of some of the dangers above 
cited or to a, habit acquired through ignorance or bravado. Stimulants 
include alcohol, coffee, tea and certain drugs. 

7. Make the day the routine of life — don't try to catch up on Sundays only. 

IV. THE LAST FACTOR in the cure of this national health decline is that of pro- 
viding for the cases of sickness which occur. It is THE RELIEF 
SCHEME. Just as we have accident insurance in order to compensate for 
accidents we should have sickness insurance in order to compensate for 
sickness. It is best to call this "HEALTH INSURANCE" for we wish to 
maintain health. Such insurance is the real active agent in bringing per- 
sons to observe the Laws of Health, to have Physical Examinations made 
and to see that their Surroundings are Healthful. To bring this about the 
insurance should be supported by the worker (2/5), by the employer (2/5), 
and by the state (1/5). By this means every one is financially interested in 
prolonging health, increasing efficiency and maintaining a high standard of 
production. 

WORK SHOULD PROMOTE HEALTH, NOT DESTROY IT 



III. AVOID DANGERS TO HEALTH — Know What They Are. Here are some 
of them and their limits: 

1. The AIR in most buildings heated by stoves, furnaces, steam or hot water is 

stagnant, too hot and too dry — dryer than that of the Sahara Desert. 
Hence sore throats, colds, and many forms of sickness. 

GOOD AIR: 

CIRCULATES — and by so doing tones up the human system by striking 
the skin, thus improving the blood-flow, and removing the "envelope of 
heat" which is given off by the body and constantly surrounds it. Use 
electric fans or cloth-windows or window-boards or ventilators. A just 
perceptible "breath" is enough (or air blowing 5 to 10 feet per second). 
Has RELATIVE HUMIDITY of 45 to 65%. Learn the use of the wet- 
bulb thermometer. When not too cold, proper moisture can be had by 
admitting outdoor air (note cloth-windows). It may take 10 to 20 gallons 
of water per day for a six-room house. Few, if any, pan and water schemes 
will evaporate this amount of water. 

Has a TEMPERATURE (indoors) of from 60 to 68° F. This temperature 
feels perfectly comfortable when the air is properly moistened — -it also 
saves on the coal bill. 

Has no irritating FLOATING PARTICLES — dust, smoke, etc. 
Has no noticeable GASES, FUMES OR VAPORS — these are especially 
dangers of modern industries. Any ODOR should be pleasant — the air 
should be just like that supplied by Nature. 

Not POLLUTED by disease germs. Most so-called "air-borne diseases" 
are really caught by contact with, or close approach to, persons carrying 
the germs. Such "carriers" may not themselves be sick and also may be in 
total ignorance of their own menace. Avoid touching persons as much as 
possible. Keep beyond the breathing range, and, finally, wash your hands 
often to prevent carrying disease to your face and mouth. 

2. GOOD ILLUMINATION means: 

STEADY LIGHT from over the shoulders — 5-10 foot-candles of ARTI- 
FICIAL light for ordinary eye work, 5 f. c. in foundries and similar places, 
and j? f. c. on the floors of general workrooms. Daylight COLOR is the 
best." DAYLIGHT should be three times stronger than artificial light. 
(A foot-candle is the amount of light given by a standard candle one foot 
away). 

Absence of sharp contrasts of lights and shadows; have light-colored walls 
and ceilings to reflect light instead of absorbing it; unobstructed light, as 
from the upper half of windows — dirty windows may obstruct 4/5 of the 
light, while dark shades should not be used in workrooms, offices, or 
schools; protection of the eyes against brilliant and hot lights. 

GOOD EYE-SIGHT — perhaps, after all, your eye-sight is defective and 
your eyes need examining — most headaches are from eyestrain — eyestrain 
may be as fatiguing, also, as the most arduous work. 

3. POISONS. Workers with poisons should be properly instructed in their use. 

The COURTS have decided that the responsibility of such instruction 
rests upon the employer. In Ohio the State Department of Health stands 
prepared to issue INSTRUCTIONS for the avoidance of poisoning of all 
sorts. Most poisonings occur because employers and workers both CON- 
SIDER the substances dealt with as too innocent to cause much harm. 
This attitude has unfortunately caused an immense amount of sickness, 
numerous deaths, and many LAW SUITS for large amounts of money. The 
State Laboratories will analyze suspected poisons used in connection with 
work, provided the sources, uses and reasons for the analyses are stated. 
The Department of Health will also supply INFORMATION as to the 
maximum amount of poisonous substances which can be present in the air 
or may be taken into the system without causing symptoms — This insofar 
as it has information or can secure the same. By law, all instances of pois- 
oning in connection with work must be brought TO THE NOTICE of the 
State Department of Health, which Department furnishes the proper blanks 
for recording the information and investigates the occurrence with a view 
to finding out how to avoid similar mishaps. Such reports cannot be used 
as evidence of the facts therein in any action arising out of the disease 



therein reported. Most poisonings occur through workers poisoning them- 
selves, which is due to IGNORANCE or DISREGARD of instructions, but 
upon the employer rests the responsibility of supervision. The more 
COMMON POISONS used in the State of Ohio are about in order of their 
frequency of use and their liability to produce occupational disease: lead, 
benzine and benzol (naphtha, petrol, gasoline, etc.), turpentine and similar 
dryers, brass or zinc in the form of fumes; acids, alkalis, wood alcohol, 
anilin oil, carbon bisulphide, antimony, illuminating and fuel gas, sulphur- 
• ated hydrogen, arsenic, phosphorus and mercury. 

4. FATIGUE. A tired feeling is nature's warning to rest. Getting tired de- 

pends largely upon who you are and how well you may be. Work should 
promote health and a sense of well-being. "So tired" should never be heard 
at the end of a day's work, as it signifies exhaustion. All straining or 
heavy or rapid work should be tempered or subjected to changes so that no 
feeling of exhaustion results. This applies to the eyes, or to the hands, as 
well as to the whole body. True "Scientific Management" observes these 
principles and makes use of several methods of doing routine work. On 
the other hand, TOO LITTLE EXERCISE is a serious danger to large 
numbers of persons who are not actively employed. Variation, which will 
allow exercise, is the secret of efficiency and steadfastness. The best stand- 
ard for fatigue or inactivity is that "tired feeling". Avoid it. 

5. TEMPERATURE. The exposure to heat produces thermic fever if the tem- 

perature goes beyond that of the human body (98.6°) ; beyond this, prostra- 
tions, muscular cramps and anemia are produced. Premature old age is a 
common result. When COMBINED WITH MOISTURE the effects upon 
the health are very much worse. For the best work, neither the wet nor 
dry thermometer should exceed 70° F. The shower-bath is a most excellent 
way to control the circulation of the blood upon quitting the hot work- 
place preparatory to going outside. In almost all trades heat can be con- 
trolled or kept away from workmen. EXPOSURE TO COLD, pure and 
simple, is not dangerous to health provided enough clothing is worn and 
enough active work is performed. Cooling one part of the body while 
heating another is bad. 

6. DIRT AND DISORDERED SURROUNDINGS are dangerous to health 

because they favor disease, obstruct light, make one less inclined to do a 
high class of work; also to observe health standards, correct habits and 
good morals, whether at home, at work, or elsewhere. 

7. THE NATURAL DESIRES create great risks to health — 

1. THIRST must be supplied with safe drinking water. 

2. HUNGER must be supplied with clean, nourishing food eaten in a place 
free from poisons. 

3. TOILETS, URINALS, SEWERAGE and GARBAGE devices must not 
engender disease. 

4. SLEEP must not be disturbed and must last eight hours every night. 

5. RECREATION must not be dissipative but recreative. 

6. The desire for STIMULANTS is always abnormal to the healthy person; 
when present it is usually due to the effects of some of the dangers above 
cited or to a habit acquired through ignorance or bravado. Stimulants 
include alcohol, coffee, tea and certain drugs. 

7. Make the day the routine of life — don't try to catch up on Sundays only. 

IV. THE LAST FACTOR in the cure of this national health decline is that of pro- 
viding for the cases of sickness which occur. It is THE RELIEF 
SCHEME. Just as we have accident insurance in order to compensate for 
accidents we should have sickness insurance in order to compensate for 
sickness. It is best to call this "HEALTH INSURANCE" for wewish to 
maintain health. Such insurance is the real active agent in bringing per- 
sons to observe the Laws of Health, to have Physical Examinations made 
and to see that their Surroundings are Healthful. To bring this about the 
insurance should be supported by the worker (2/5), by the employer (2/5), 
and by the state (1/5). By this means every one is financially interested in 
prolonging health, increasing efficiency 'and maintaining a high standard of 
production. 

WORK SHOULD PROMOTE HEALTH, NOT DESTROY IT 



III. AVOID DANGERS TO HEALTH — Know What They Are. Here are some 
of them and their limits: 

1. The AIR in most buildings heated by stoves, furnaces, steam or hot water is 

stagnant, too hot and too dry — dryer than that of the Sahara Desert. 
Hence sore throats, colds, and many forms of sickness. 

GOOD AIR: 

CIRCULATES — and by so doing tones up the human system by striking 
the skin, thus improving the blood-flow, and removing the "envelope of 
heat" which is given off by the body and constantly surrounds it. Use 
electric fans or cloth-windows or window-boards or ventilators. A just 
perceptible "breath" is enough (or air blowing 5 to 10 feet per second). 
Has RELATIVE HUMIDITY of 45 to 65%. Learn the use of the wet- 
bulb thermometer. When not too cold, proper moisture can be had by 
admitting outdoor air (note cloth-windows). It may take 10 to 20 gallons 
of water per day for a six-room house. Few, if any, pan and water schemes 
will evaporate this amount of water. 

Has a TEMPERATURE (indoors) of from 60 to 68° F. This temperature 
feels perfectly comfortable when the air is properly moistened — it also 
saves on the coal bill. 

Has no irritating FLOATING PARTICLES — dust, smoke, etc. 
Has no noticeable GASES, FUMES OR VAPORS — these are especially 
dangers of modern industries. Any ODOR should be pleasant — the air 
should be just like that supplied by Nature. 

Not POLLUTED by disease germs. Most so-called "air-borne diseases" 
are really caught by contact with, or close approach to, persons carrying 
the germs. Such "carriers" may not themselves be sick and also may be in 
total ignorance of their own menace. Avoid touching persons as much as 
possible. Keep beyond the breathing range, and, finally, wash your hands 
often to prevent carrying disease to your face and mouth. 

2. GOOD ILLUMINATION means: 

STEADY LIGHT from over the shoulders — 5-10 foot-candles of ARTI- 
FICIAL light for ordinary eye work, 5 f. c. in foundries and similar peaces, 
and 2 f- c - on the floors of general workrooms. Daylight COLOR is the 
best. DAYLIGHT should be three times stronger than artificial light. 
(A foot-candle is the amount of light given by a standard candle one foot 
away). 

Absence of sharp contrasts of lights and shadows; have light-colored walls 
and ceilings to reflect light instead of absorbing it; unobstructed light, as 
from the upper half of windows — dirty windows may obstruct 4/5 of the 
light, while dark shades should not be used in workrooms, offices, cr 
schools; protection of the eyes against brilliant and hot lights. 

GOOD EYE-SIGHT — perhaps, after all, your eye-sight is defective and 
your eyes need examining — most headaches are from eyestrain — eyestrain 
may be as fatiguing, also, as the most arduous work. 

3. POISONS. Workers with poisons should be properly instructed in their use. 

The COURTS have decided that the responsibility of such instruction 
rests upon the employer. In Ohio the State Department of Health stands 
prepared to issue INSTRUCTIONS for the avoidance of poisoning of all 
sorts. Most poisonings occur because employers and workers both CON- 
SIDER the substances dealt with as too innocent to cause much harm. 
This attitude has unfortunately caused an immense amount of sickness, 
numerous deaths, and many LAW SUITS for large amounts of money. The 
State Laboratories will analyze suspected poisons used in connection with 
work, provided the sources, uses and reasons for the analyses are stated. 
The Department of Health will also supply INFORMATION as to the 
maximum amount of poisonous substances which can be present in the air 
or may be taken into the system without causing symptoms — This insofar 
as it has information or can secure the same. By law, all instances of pois- 
oning in connection with work must be brought TO THE NOTICE of the 
State Department of Health, which Department furnishes the proper blanks 
for recording the information and investigates the occurrence with a view 
to finding out how to avoid similar mishaps. Such reports cannot be used 
as evidence of the facts therein in any action arising out of the disease 



therein reported. Most poisonings occur through workers poisoning them- 
selves, which is due to IGNORANCE or DISREGARD of instructions, but 
upon the employer rests the responsibility of supervision. The more 
COMMON POISONS used in the State of Ohio are about in order of their 
frequency of use and their liability to produce occupational disease: lead, 
benzine and benzol (naphtha, petrol, gasoline, etc.), turpentine and similar 
dryers, brass or zinc_in the form of fumes; acids, alkalis, wood alcohol, 
anilin oil, carbon bisulphide, antimony, illuminating and fuel gas, sulphur- 
ated hydrogen, arsenic, phosphorus and mercury. 

4. FATIGUE. A tired feeling is nature's warning to rest. Getting tired de- 

pends largely upon who you are and how well you may be. Work should 
promote health and a sense of well-being. "So tired" should never be heard 
at the end of a day's work, as it signifies exhaustion. All straining or 
heavy or rapid work should be tempered or subjected to changes so that no 
feeling of exhaustion results. This applies to the eyes, or to the hands, as 
well as to the whole body. True "Scientific Management" observes these 
principles and makes use of several methods of doing routine work. On 
the other hand, TOO LITTLE EXERCISE is a serious danger to large 
numbers of persons who are not actively employed. Variation, which will 
allow exercise, is the secret of efficiency and steadfastness. The best stand- 
ard for fatigue or inactivity is that "tired feeling". Avoid it. 

5. TEMPERATURE. The exposure to heat produces thermic fever if the tem- 

perature goes beyond that of the human body (98.6°) ; beyond this, prostra- 
tions, muscular cramps and anemia are produced. Premature old age is a 
common result. When COMBINED WITH MOISTURE the effects upon 
the health are very much worse. For the best work, neither the wet nor : 
dry thermometer should exceed 70 u F. The shower-bath is a most excellent 
way to control the circulation of the blood upon quitting the hot work- 
place preparatory to going outside. In almost all trades heat can be con- 
trolled or kept away from workmen. EXPOSURE TO COLD, pure and 
simple, is not dangerous to health provided enough clothing is worn and 
enough active work is performed. Cooling one part of the body while 
heating another is bad. 

6. DIRT AND DISORDERED SURROUNDINGS are dangerous to health 

because they favor disease, obstruct light, make one less inclined to do a 
high class of work; also to observe health standards, correct habits and 
good morals, whether at home, at work, or elsewhere. 

7. THE NATURAL DESIRES create great risks to health — 

1. THIRST must be supplied with safe drinking water. 

2. HUNGER must be supplied with clean, nourishing food eaten in a place 
free from poisons. 

3. TOILETS, URINALS, SEWERAGE and GARBAGE devices must not 
engender disease. 

4. SLEEP must not be disturbed and must last eight hours every night. 

5. RECREATION must not be dissipative but recreative. 

6. The desire for STIMULANTS is always abnormal to the healthy person; 
when present it is usually due to the effects of some of the dangers above 
cited or to a habit acquired through ignorance or bravado. Stimulants 
include alcohol, coffee, tea and certain drugs. 

7. Make the day the routine of life — don't try to catch up on Sundays only. 

IV. THE LAST FACTOR in the cure of this national health decline is that of pro- 
viding for the cases of sickness which occur. It is THE RELIEF 
SCHEME. Just as we have accident insurance in order to compensate for 
accidents we should have sickness insurance in order to compensate for 
sickness. It is best to call this "HEALTH INSURANCE" for we wish to 
maintain health. Such insurance is the real active agent in bringing per- 
sons to observe the Laws of Health, to have Physical Examinations made 
and to see that their Surroundings are Healthful. To bring this about the 
insurance should be supported by the worker (2/5), by the employer (2/5), 
and by the state (1/5). By this means every one is financially interested in 
prolonging health, increasing efficiency and maintaining a high standard of 
production. 

WORK SHOULD PROMOTE HEALTH, NOT DESTROY IT 



raulord ■ 



G«& 

_PAMPMET BINDER 

~^^Z Syracuse, N. Y. 
^^Z Stockton, Calif. 




3 9088 00041 2254 

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION LIBRARIES